institutionalization

(redirected from institutionalized)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

institutionalization

 [in″stĭ-too″shun-al″ĭ-za´shun]
1. commitment of a patient to a health care facility for treatment, often psychiatric.
2. in patients hospitalized for a long period, the development of excessive dependency on the institution and its routines, with diminishing of the will to function independently.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

institutionalization

(ĭn″stĭ-too″shŭn-ăl-ĭ-zā′shŭn)
1. Residence in or confinement to a nursing home or other long-term care setting for an extended period.
2. Arranging for a person to be placed in a health care facility.
3. The process in which people who live together gradually develop certain common patterns of behavior and thought (e.g., assumption of illness and depression apathy, behaviors frequently associated with nursing home residency). The current movement in medicine and nursing is away from institutionalism to a more homelike environment.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
(2007) maintained that if the goal is to gather a general impression about the outcome, employing voice as a composite measurement for institutionalized socialization tactics is acceptable.
A total of 341 elderly subjects were included, 280 institutionalized (134 male and 146 female, mean age 72.7[+ or -]8.4 years) and 61 non-institutionalized (23 male and 38 female, mean age 70.4[+ or -]6.2 years).
By the time BEIP was begun in 2000, the Romanian government had begun reuniting children with their birth families, cutting Romania's institutionalized population in half.
Additionally, the Cronbach alpha for the 21-item scale was computed for each group in the study: the institutionalized group (n=40) were .8276 and the non-institutionalized group (n=40) was .7639.
The present study was planned to assess and compare the well-being of institutionalized and non-institutionalized elderly.
Rates of depression were 8.5% in the institutionalized children, compared with 3% among children in foster care.
No matter how public in placement, immaterial, transitory, relational, everyday, or even invisible, what is announced and perceived as art is always already institutionalized, simply because it exists within the perception of participants in the field of art as art, a perception not necessarily aesthetic but fundamentally social in its determination.
This measure targets only two areas of government regulation--those relating to land use and zoning and those dealing with institutionalized persons.
Thus NSA/CSS systems engineering policies, processes, and directives are institutionalized within major development efforts.
Under the 2003 Medicare Modernization Act, Medicare Advantage plans can limit enrollment to beneficiaries who are dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid, or long-term institutionalized beneficiaries.
For institutionalized elders, poor oral hygiene, decreased activity levels, and medication-induced xerostomia can create favorable conditions for the pathogens that cause lower respiratory tract infection.
This analysis of the Casa de Huerfanos thus sheds light not only on the comparative history of foundling homes and child abandonment but also on the historical evolution of welfare provision in its informal and institutionalized guises.