institutionalization


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institutionalization

 [in″stĭ-too″shun-al″ĭ-za´shun]
1. commitment of a patient to a health care facility for treatment, often psychiatric.
2. in patients hospitalized for a long period, the development of excessive dependency on the institution and its routines, with diminishing of the will to function independently.

institutionalization

(ĭn″stĭ-too″shŭn-ăl-ĭ-zā′shŭn)
1. Residence in or confinement to a nursing home or other long-term care setting for an extended period.
2. Arranging for a person to be placed in a health care facility.
3. The process in which people who live together gradually develop certain common patterns of behavior and thought (e.g., assumption of illness and depression apathy, behaviors frequently associated with nursing home residency). The current movement in medicine and nursing is away from institutionalism to a more homelike environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on Arter and Kestila-Kakkonen's approach (2014) the division into the electoral, internal and legislative institutionalization dimensions is being preserved.
Yet even where legalization levels are relatively low and international consensus is a distant prospect, there is still a variety of institutionalization strategies that norm promoters may pursue to reduce inconsistency in norm enforcement.
More recent scholarship that examines institutionalization among new democracies does not presume that party institutionalization and democratic consolidation are mutually reinforcing.
The stability of interparty competition has been the central focus of most analyses of party system institutionalization. While the other three components of Mainwaring and Scully's original framework have frequently been replaced or modified by subsequent researchers, the stability component has remained a constant feature.
The institutionalization is considered either a dichotomous phenomenon that may appear or not (21) (Sartori 1976) or a process through which parties and party systems transform and make steps towards becoming institutionalized or the reverse (Mainwaring and Torcall 2006, 206).
Institutionalization: Definition, institutionalization of family businesses, and some current studies in Turkey
Institutionalization is important, because it provides a sound base for achieving efficiency and effectiveness.
Following this, the Department of Human Services will review the program's effectiveness at reintegrating participants back to their life before hospitalization, and preventing unnecessary institutionalization of these physically disabled or mentally ill persons.
Finally, after all these years, ethics met institutionalization on professor Kiril Temkov's initiative of a serious of projects carried out in elementary schools and experimental education in high schools dedicated to ethnic education.
Of the 167 patients, 29 (17%) required postoperative institutionalization, and there was a significant difference in institutionalization rates between those aged 70 years or older and younger patients, said Dr.
Yet there is one question I am still asking: How does a tradition get passed along without some institutionalization? Would we have the sacramental understandings she so appreciates if the institution had not been so stable all those years?