instinct

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instinct

 [in´stinkt]
a complex of unlearned responses characteristic of a species. adj., adj instinc´tive.
death instinct Freud's concept of an unconscious drive toward dissolution and death, in opposition to the life instinct.
herd instinct the instinct or urge to be one of a group and to conform to its standards of conduct and opinion.
life instinct Freud's concept of all the constructive tendencies of the organism aimed at maintenance and perpetuation of the individual and species, in opposition to the death instinct.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·stinct

(in'stinkt),
1. An enduring disposition or tendency of an organism to act in an organized and biologically adaptive manner characteristic of its species.
2. The unreasoning impulse to perform some purposeful action without an immediate consciousness of the end to which that action may lead.
3. In psychoanalytic theory, the forces or drives assumed to exist behind the tension caused by the needs of the id.
[L. instinctus, impulse]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

instinct

(ĭn′stĭngkt′)
n.
1. An inborn pattern of behavior that is characteristic of a species and is often a response to specific environmental stimuli: the spawning instinct in salmon; altruistic instincts in social animals.
2. A powerful motivation or impulse.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

instinct

Psychiatry Inborn drive An unreasoning response to an environmental cue, attributed to the Freudian id Primary human instincts Self-preservation, sexuality; per some, aggression, ego instincts, heroism, social instincts are also primary instincts. See Death instinct, Id.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·stinct

(in'stingkt)
1. An enduring disposition or tendency to act in an organized and biologically adaptive manner.
2. The unreasoning impulse to perform some purposive action without an immediate consciousness of the end to which that action may lead.
3. psychoanalytic theory The forces assumed to exist behind the tension caused by the needs of the id.
[L. instinctus, impulse]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

instinct

aspects of behaviour that are not learned, but which appear to be inherited, i.e. INNATE BEHAVIOUR. It is not now used commonly as a scientific term because of the difficulty of distinguishing between some aspects of learning and some aspects of so-called instinctive behaviour.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

in·stinct

(in'stingkt)
Enduring disposition or tendency of an organism to act in an organized and biologically adaptive manner characteristic of its species.
[L. instinctus, impulse]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Or is it that "it was to be"10 because in the woods where Alec seduces her, her instinctual desire gets the better of her conscious self.
Just like heart auscultation, ADR is a technique that allows a specialist to learn how to diagnose and interpret mechanical neuromuscular signals, whereby the significance of these impulses is the "dictionary" used to analyse a structural map in which neurological correlations between events, emotional states, instinctual drives, and physical reactions are established and maintained.
Perlovsky considers emotions as neural signals connecting instinctual and conceptual brain regions.
There is great value in gaining an understanding of the body's instinctual wisdom, which so often goes ignored for so many reasons.
A clash exists between two emotional forces: instinctual drives versus prohibiting personal and social standards.
Saura's loose, whimsical brushstrokes and bold washes of color lend her paintings an instinctual, child-like spontaneity that belies her sophisticated command of composition, balance, shape, coloration, and line.
I am sure many readers who took the time were taken back to more instinctual times.
We like the scrappy, dangerous, instinctual and real.
You might conclude from the dearth of communicable insight about the artistic wonders they accomplish that for them, creativity is a vague, dreamy, purely instinctual business in which intellect and precision play nary a part.
It is only through an instinctual will to survive and the unselfishness of Old Tallow, the woman who had long ago rescued Omayaka, that the family is able to see their way through the winter and to their journey's end.
"The new Animal Planet is full of exciting, instinctual stories that will bring out the raw, visceral emotion in the natural world and lead viewers to see animals as characters, not merely creatures.
EVOLIST would begin the discussion by linking Dickens at his worst to the instinctual desire for pleasure or gratification, a narcissistic indulgence in one's own exquisite sensations at the expense of realism or reality, and Dickens at his best to the human capacity to transcend instinct and to confront, intellectually and emotionally, the deeper complexities or "dissonance" of existence.