instinct

(redirected from instinctly)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

instinct

 [in´stinkt]
a complex of unlearned responses characteristic of a species. adj., adj instinc´tive.
death instinct Freud's concept of an unconscious drive toward dissolution and death, in opposition to the life instinct.
herd instinct the instinct or urge to be one of a group and to conform to its standards of conduct and opinion.
life instinct Freud's concept of all the constructive tendencies of the organism aimed at maintenance and perpetuation of the individual and species, in opposition to the death instinct.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·stinct

(in'stinkt),
1. An enduring disposition or tendency of an organism to act in an organized and biologically adaptive manner characteristic of its species.
2. The unreasoning impulse to perform some purposeful action without an immediate consciousness of the end to which that action may lead.
3. In psychoanalytic theory, the forces or drives assumed to exist behind the tension caused by the needs of the id.
[L. instinctus, impulse]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

instinct

(ĭn′stĭngkt′)
n.
1. An inborn pattern of behavior that is characteristic of a species and is often a response to specific environmental stimuli: the spawning instinct in salmon; altruistic instincts in social animals.
2. A powerful motivation or impulse.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

instinct

Psychiatry Inborn drive An unreasoning response to an environmental cue, attributed to the Freudian id Primary human instincts Self-preservation, sexuality; per some, aggression, ego instincts, heroism, social instincts are also primary instincts. See Death instinct, Id.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·stinct

(in'stingkt)
1. An enduring disposition or tendency to act in an organized and biologically adaptive manner.
2. The unreasoning impulse to perform some purposive action without an immediate consciousness of the end to which that action may lead.
3. psychoanalytic theory The forces assumed to exist behind the tension caused by the needs of the id.
[L. instinctus, impulse]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

instinct

aspects of behaviour that are not learned, but which appear to be inherited, i.e. INNATE BEHAVIOUR. It is not now used commonly as a scientific term because of the difficulty of distinguishing between some aspects of learning and some aspects of so-called instinctive behaviour.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

in·stinct

(in'stingkt)
Enduring disposition or tendency of an organism to act in an organized and biologically adaptive manner characteristic of its species.
[L. instinctus, impulse]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012