inspissation


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Related to inspissation: pasteurization, Tyndallization

in·spis·sa·tion

(in'spi-sā'shŭn),
1. The act of thickening or condensing, as by evaporation or absorption of fluid.
2. An increased thickening or diminished fluidity.
[L. in, intensive, + spisso, pp. -atus, to thicken]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

inspissation

Plugging of a tubular lumen–eg, bile ducts, intestine, with a thickened viscid material having a decreased fluid content
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·spis·sa·tion

(in'spi-sā'shŭn)
1. The act of thickening or condensing, as by evaporation or absorption of fluid.
2. An increased thickening or diminished fluidity.
[L. in, intensive, + spisso, pp.-atus, to thicken]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

inspissation

(ĭn-spĭ-sā′shŭn)
1. Thickening by evaporation or absorption of fluid.
2. Diminished fluidity or increased thickness.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Contents: John Wilson Yamamoto, "Catholic Literature and the Rise of Anglicanism"; Peter Milward, "Shakespeare's Inspissation," "Shakespeare's Sacred Fools," "Shakespeare's Sermon," "Shakespeare's 'Miracles' in the Context of Religious Controversy," and "Notice-Board."
(Eschatological Inspissation) Those who lived with occasion for infamy or praise have no truck with her.
Similar histochemical reactions in the dense platelike secretions and crystalloid morphology confirm our morphologic observation, and we speculate that the loss of acidity of secretions (compared to fluidlike secretions, which are acidic) provides a trigger for inspissation and subsequent crystallization.
His incisive presentation of Shakespeare's 1609 quarto centres on its poetic techniques: 'the energising of the text by metaphorical shifts', the 'marginalisation of the speaker', and 'inspissation .