insipid

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insipid

[insip′id]
Etymology: L, in + sapidus, savory
dull, tasteless, or lifeless.
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L'io-narratore, il personaggio che sta al centro dell'immaginario circolo del Post-boy, conclude la serie dei commenti dei lettori con la seguente dichiarazione: "For my part I am of opinion if these sort of Prophaneness are indications of Wit, every fool may be so at the expences of God Almighty, and I think this Letter like the rest of the Discourses of this Nature, is beholding to a little pert jingle of Words, flashy, and positive Assertions, with a rambling kind Mirth to make the insipidness, and sterility of the Reason pass; in this Letter he seems to aim at Self Preservation, and yet takes the sure Path to destruction, in Body, Soul, and Estate" (22-23).
Shklovsky suggests that to counter the insipidness of automatised language, the word needs to be resurrected by deautomatizing it.
He also charged his own with the task of being salt--that is, to preserve and not to destroy, to add flavor and zest where there would otherwise be Insipidness and indifference.
You agree that if their voice was perhaps an octave higher then the good times would at last roll; of course, if the object of their affections was preoccupied by the seemingly stale and insipidness of your petulant sanctimonious friend's life then they obviously had ridiculously high and exacting standards and it was no wonder they were on their own.
Although Avercamp's subject is, in essence, sheer joy, he manages to avoid insipidness not only through his craftsmanship and attention to telling details, but through his ability to capture an evolving and important aspect of his society's underlying ethos: from a nationalistic standpoint, the very contentment of the Dutch could be taken as a manifestation of their rectitude and their right to stand independent from the oppressive designs of outside powers, namely Catholic Spain (a concept broadly analogous to a line of thinking I discussed in Apollo, March 2009, with reference to 17th-century Dutch cityscapes).
Prop Andrew Sheridan was another who was awfully quiet for someone many believe has the loosehead duties secured, and wing Paul Sackey was nowhere near involved enough, his insipidness in such contrast to someone like Shane Williams who went looking for the ball all afternoon for Wales.