insipid

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insipid

[insip′id]
Etymology: L, in + sapidus, savory
dull, tasteless, or lifeless.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This insipidly insinuates that both everything that is not human is inhuman, thus brutal, and that the human should be valued more than anything.
She tries to convince us she knows enough about dancing to pass judgement, but so far she's just been bland and insipidly pleasant.
ObamaAAEs insipidly favorable response to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin NetanyahuAAEs conditional AoacceptanceAo of the two-state formula underscores an unfortunate continuity in AmericaAAEs Middle East policy.
Among the latter: Ang Lee's campy Taking Woodstock, which empties the 60s event of any political subtext but offers a fun spree through sex, drugs, and silliness; Ken Loach's bubbly Looking for Eric with Eric Cantona (fun to watch) about a postal worker getting his life back together with a bit of "teamwork"; Alejandro Amenabar's Agora, set in ancient Egypt with soap-opera scenes galore (a la Ben Hur); and Alain Renais insipidly quirky Les Herbes Folles, about a menage a quatre.
Chao displays a wry sense of humour, creating scenarios where women decide to step outside of social norms and expectations, such as by refusing to accept a nice but insipidly boring man in "African Lion Safari," or by gleefully surrendering to lesbian love in "A Wanton Woman.
Most people playing a female character (at least half of whom are male in real life, probably more) go for the tall and insipidly lovely human and night-elf races.
When so many other contemporaneous male writers were creating silent or at best insipidly or shrilly tongued female characters, Lorca invested his finest poetic talent in writing leading parts for women in which their subjectivity is manifest in all its complexity.
For miles and miles about the low dark green line of coast the sea is insipidly fresh and hideously yellow, with the tremendous outpour of the river water .
From the last room a chatter permeating all the galleries was revealed to be recorded voices from a fake art dinner emanating from beneath Thierry Mouille's Le Banquet, 2001, an insipidly conceived work consisting of a U-shaped conference table set with white paper and plastic picnic utensils.
However, if the mood is considered and impartial, it is never insipidly neutral.