insidious

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insidious

 [in-sid´e-us]
coming on stealthily; of gradual and subtle development.

in·sid·i·ous

(in-sid'ē-ŭs),
Treacherous; stealthy; denoting a disease that progresses gradually with inapparent symptoms.
[L. insidiosus, cunning, fr. insidiae (pl.), an ambush]

in·sid·i·ous

(in-sid'ē-ŭs)
Treacherous; stealthy; denoting a disease that progresses gradually with inapparent symptoms.

insidious

Of disease, occurring or progressing in an imperceptible manner so as to reach a harmful stage before being suspected.

Insidious

Developing in a stealthy or gradual manner. Sydenham's chorea may have an insidious onset.
Mentioned in: Sydenham's Chorea

in·sid·i·ous

(in-sid'ē-ŭs)
Treacherous; stealthy; denoting a disease that progresses gradually with inapparent symptoms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many religious groups condemned the film while sometimes assessing its qualities, perhaps to warn against its insidiousness. Harry Forbes of the Conference of Catholic Bishops concluded a detailed review by stating: "While the actions taken by Ennis and Jack cannot be endorsed, the universal themes of love and loss ring true." (15) By managing to depict a love story that rang "true," Ang Lee certainly sent Annie Proulx's message to the masses and a compelling star-crossed lovers' story found the perfect medium, one that Jean-Luc Godard called "truth 24 times per second." (16)
Equally as destructive is the insidiousness of an attack upon its most important and cohesive unit, that of the family.
To their credit, some economists have candidly examined the truth of this phenomenon, and some have even criticized its insidiousness; in academia, it goes by the name "inflationary finance." Yet most economists still insist that central banking is an essential feature of a free market, and that its purpose is to fight inflation, smooth business cycles, foster jobs, preempt "bubbles," and prevent financial crises.
Wells's timeless allegory for the insidiousness of 19th-century British imperialism is best seen in all its 1950s Technicolor glory.
If the insidiousness of the Pleasant Grove government speech doctrine was limited to stone monuments, or if it affected only the one in five Americans who do not believe in any religion, (59) it would be bad enough, but at least there would be some restriction on its reach.
There need be no more exhausting vigilance against the snares of the evil one and the insidiousness of sin.
It is here that the insidiousness of difference finds its true expression because it is immobilised at the very moment it is called upon to be recognised and so deconstructed.
These diverse voices rise up in a collective roar to break open, expose, and examine the insidiousness of violence at all levels: brutality, neglect, a punch, even a put-down.
"But often, when someone is fighting the insidiousness of depression, there is the possibility of medication and treatment and ways to change that horrible bleak situation into something much more positive."
VOTER FRAUD: An assault on democracy so cunning in its insidiousness that no examples can be found.
But the production of films like Intruder in the Dust, Home of the Brave, and Lost Boundaries--as well as Gentleman's Agreement (1947) and Crossfire (1947), both of which exposed the insidiousness of anti-Semitism--augured well for Taylor.
For idealists, of course, these sordid manifestations might not qualify as "love" in the first place, but restricting them from our definition leaves us with either crude tautology (only ideal love is real love) or infinite regress (love is not obsession, not sentimentality, not insidiousness...).