insertion


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

insertion

 [in-ser´shun]
1. the act of implanting, or condition of being implanted.
2. the site of attachment, as of a muscle to the bone that it moves.
3. in genetics, a rare nonreciprocal type of translocation in which a segment is removed from one chromosome and then inserted into a broken region of a nonhomologous chromosome.
airway insertion and stabilization in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as insertion or assisting with insertion and stabilization of an artificial airway. See also artificial airway management.
intravenous (IV) insertion in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as insertion of a needle into a peripheral vein for the purpose of intravenous infusion of fluids, blood, or medications.
thought insertion the delusion that thoughts that are not one's own are being inserted into one's mind.
velamentous insertion attachment of the umbilical cord to the edge of the placenta.

in·ser·tion

(in-sĕr'shŭn),
1. A putting in.
2. The usually more distal attachment of a muscle to the more movable part of the skeleton, as distinguished from origin.
3. In dentistry, the intraoral placing of a dental prosthesis.
4. Intrusion of fragments of any size from molecular to cytogenetic into the normal genome.
[L. insertio, a planting in, fr. insero, -sertus, to plant in]

insertion

(ĭn-sûr′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of inserting.
2. Anatomy The point or mode of attachment of a skeletal muscle to the bone or other body part that it moves.
3. Genetics The addition, as by mutation, of one or more nucleotides to a chromosome.

in·ser′tion·al adj.

in·ser·tion

(in-sĕr'shŭn)
1. A putting in.
2. The attachment of a muscle to the more movable part of the skeleton, as distinguished from origin.
3. dentistry The intraoral placing of a dental prosthesis.
4. Intrusion of fragments of any size from molecular to cytogenetic into the normal genome.
[L. insertio, a planting in, fr. insero, -sertus, to plant in]

insertion

  1. a point of attachment of an organ such as a leaf or muscle.
  2. the point of application of force by a muscle.

in·ser·tion

(in-sĕr'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, the intraoral placing of a dental prosthesis.
2. The usually more distal attachment of a muscle to the more movable part of the skeleton, as distinguished from origin.
[L. insertio, a planting in, fr. insero, -sertus, to plant in]
References in periodicals archive ?
Out of 21 controls 14 (66.6%%) had insertion from public hospitals, 2 (9.52%) from private hospitals and 5 (23.8%) from family planning centers.
Ping Lacson is correct with his observation that the P75-billion insertion in the National Expediture Program [NEP] was a conspiracy between the DBM and the previous House leadership [of former Speaker Pantaleon Alvarez],' he said.
The chairman of the House Committee on Appropriations said yesterday he would question before the Supreme Court the possible restoration of the P75-billion insertions in the proposed P3.757-trillion national budget via a veto message, citing that it will be a "clear mockery of the power of Congress to scrutinize the budget."
Non-office insertion. Either a sedation unit or operating room was utilized in 5.5% of the IUD insertions in the SA group and 47.6% of the NSA group.
The observation that although nursing staff at both the SDH and medical college were trained in post-placental IUCD insertion, there were no PPIUCD insertions following vaginal delivery by the nursing staff in the medical college is worrying.
In temporal bone studies [1, 2], the HiFocus Mid-Scala electrode has demonstrated an average angular insertion depth of 420[degrees], with a standard deviation (SD) of 21[degrees], and the HiFocus SlimJ electrode an average angular insertion depth of 413[degrees] with an SD of 42[degrees].
The investigators also looked at whether the increase they saw could be related to the common year-end practice of maximizing health insurance benefits and found a significant increase in LARC insertions from 2015 to 2016, she added.
Those who opted for PPIUCD were explained the method of insertion, advantages, mode of action, potential complications, the need for follow-up.
Identification of post insertion complaints in different types of prosthesis would be very supportive to developing strategies to prevent and manage these more effectively by reducing all negative factors associated with these complains.
The muscle found was a thin and flat fascicle composed by a 26 mm long and 1 mm wide tendinous portion, and a posterior muscular portion of 75 mm long and 7 mm wide at the widest point at the posterior insertion. This structure was located superficially to the subclavian artery and veins and to the cords of the brachial plexus and its branches (Fig.
Insertion loss is the total loss of an RF circuit, consisting of the sum of four different loss components.
So, protecting a successful IV insertion can be especially reassuring in small children.