insertion


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insertion

 [in-ser´shun]
1. the act of implanting, or condition of being implanted.
2. the site of attachment, as of a muscle to the bone that it moves.
3. in genetics, a rare nonreciprocal type of translocation in which a segment is removed from one chromosome and then inserted into a broken region of a nonhomologous chromosome.
airway insertion and stabilization in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as insertion or assisting with insertion and stabilization of an artificial airway. See also artificial airway management.
intravenous (IV) insertion in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as insertion of a needle into a peripheral vein for the purpose of intravenous infusion of fluids, blood, or medications.
thought insertion the delusion that thoughts that are not one's own are being inserted into one's mind.
velamentous insertion attachment of the umbilical cord to the edge of the placenta.

in·ser·tion

(in-sĕr'shŭn),
1. A putting in.
2. The usually more distal attachment of a muscle to the more movable part of the skeleton, as distinguished from origin.
3. In dentistry, the intraoral placing of a dental prosthesis.
4. Intrusion of fragments of any size from molecular to cytogenetic into the normal genome.
[L. insertio, a planting in, fr. insero, -sertus, to plant in]

insertion

/in·ser·tion/ (-ser´shun)
1. the act of implanting, or the condition of being implanted.
2. the site of attachment, as of a muscle to the bone that it moves.
3. in genetics, a rare nonreciprocal type of translocation in which a segment is removed from one chromosome and then inserted into a broken region of a nonhomologous chromosome.

velamentous insertion  attachment of the umbilical cord to the membranes rather than to the placenta.

insertion

(ĭn-sûr′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of inserting.
2. Anatomy The point or mode of attachment of a skeletal muscle to the bone or other body part that it moves.
3. Genetics The addition, as by mutation, of one or more nucleotides to a chromosome.

in·ser′tion·al adj.

insertion

[insur′shən]
Etymology: L, inserere, to introduce
(in anatomy) the place of attachment, such as that of a muscle to the bone it moves.

in·ser·tion

(in-sĕr'shŭn)
1. A putting in.
2. The attachment of a muscle to the more movable part of the skeleton, as distinguished from origin.
3. dentistry The intraoral placing of a dental prosthesis.
4. Intrusion of fragments of any size from molecular to cytogenetic into the normal genome.
[L. insertio, a planting in, fr. insero, -sertus, to plant in]

insertion

  1. a point of attachment of an organ such as a leaf or muscle.
  2. the point of application of force by a muscle.

insertion

with reference to a skeletal muscle, the site of its attachment to bone which during its contraction is relatively mobile, compared to the site of its origin. For example, in elbow flexion contraction of the biceps moves the forearm (site of insertion) rather than the scapula (site of origin above the shoulder joint).
insertion both insert into lateral head of flexor hallucis muscle
insertion into the linear aspera, medial supracondylar line and adductor tubercle of the femur
insertion into posterior femur, from gluteal tuberosity to adductor tubercle; insertion is perforated (the adductor opening) allowing passage of femoral vessels

insertion

muscle attachment, i.e. to free segment of joint lever arm (see origin)

insertion (in·sirˑ·shn),

n the tendinous attachment of a muscle to the bone on which the muscle operates (i.e., the bone moves when the muscle contracts).

in·ser·tion

(in-sĕr'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, the intraoral placing of a dental prosthesis.
2. The usually more distal attachment of a muscle to the more movable part of the skeleton, as distinguished from origin.
[L. insertio, a planting in, fr. insero, -sertus, to plant in]

insertion (insur´shən),

n the act of implanting or placing materials or introducing the needle into the tissues.
insertion, path of,
n the direction in which a prosthesis is inserted and removed.

insertion

1. the act of implanting, or condition of being implanted.
2. the site of attachment, as of a muscle to the bone that it moves.

insertion sequence (IS)
see transposable genetic elements.
velamentous insertion
attachment to a membrane, such as the umbilical cord to the fetal membranes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conclusion: The PD Catheter Insertion Course is exciting and unique in North America.
Conclusion: Ultrasound guided radial artery cannulation is associated with higher rate of successful insertion and less time is required for arterial line insertion as compared to blind palpation method.
The Tukey Kramer multiple comparisons test showed that there was significant difference in the mean right eye IOP between all comparisons suggesting that the IOP levels after insertion of C-LMA and ETT remained raised even after 2 mins of insertion as compared to those after insertion of I-GEL.
At baseline, the proportions of women in the immediate insertion group who reported having had unprotected sex within the two days and the week prior to interview were 17% and 23%, respectively; the proportions were 22% and 31% at the one-month followup, and 17% and 27% at the three-month follow-up.
By adding local ad insertion capability, service providers open up a brand new marketing opportunity for their own company--placing TV ads that promote their own video, broadband, and voice offers to a wider audience.
Observing the average value of the insertion loss, a resonance effect can be noticed at 3.
Before the procedure commenced, the study subjects were randomly assigned to either immediate IUD insertion (258 women) within 15 minutes after completion of the procedure, or delayed insertion (317 women) at a separate visit 2-6 weeks later.
Six minutes following administration of propofol and remifentanil, SLIPA or LMA insertion was attempted by the anaesthetist (who was unaware of the targeted effect-site concentration of remifentanil).
In the control period, 31 IUDs were inserted per month, on average, compared with 74 per month during the postabortal insertion period and 123 per month in the period with all interventions.
Advocacy helps technology insertion overcome obstacles and get funding, and that's what this office does.
The Comanche PM realigned the total program around four Blocks or spirals, each block building on the previous technology insertion.
An increase in basic residues near the cleavage site, either as a result of nucleotide insertion or substitution, allows the HA0 precursor to be cleaved by ubiquitous host proteases (5).