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in·sert

(in-sert'),
1. An additional length of base pairs in DNA that has been introduced into that DNA.
2. An additional length of bases that has been introduced into RNA.
3. An additional length of amino acyl residues that has been introduced into a protein.

insert

(in-sĕrt′, sense 1) (in′sĕrt″, sense 2) [L. inserere, to sow, plant in, implant]
1. To place or put within.
2. An object that is placed or put inside another.

insert

a segment of DNA that has been spliced into a cloning vector.
References in periodicals archive ?
Framework agreement for the purchase of various inserters for 2 years with an option for another year.
Surgeons and hospitals with PEEK Ardis Inserter instruments should immediately stop using the inserters and return them to Zimmer Spine.
The question is, How do these Wayne inserters maintain repeatable accuracy 24/7 at these high speeds?
introduced the Kansa Twister, a conveyance for carrying odd-sized inserts, the latest rage in free-standing ads, from its Multi-Feeder straight-line inserter to a rotary or circular inserter made by Harris and other companies.
Whatever do these hand inserters get up to, I wonder?
Total quantity or scope: Lot 1 inserter performance zw 900 and 1 999 / hour, estimated quantity 53 pcs.
27 /PRNewswire/ -- BOWE BELL + HOWELL, a leading provider of document processing and postal solutions, today unveiled the new Combo(R) inserting system, designed expressly to answer the mail processing industry's demand for a multi-application inserter that can change over from flats to letters quickly.
Productive, versatile and easy to use folder inserters that can grow with your business
Automated Solution Streamlines Operations by Integrating Stand-Alone Unwinders, Cutters and Folders Directly with High-Speed Inserters
The FPS(TM) system joins Pitney Bowes' family of high productivity inserters.
According to a Newspaper Association of America (NAA) survey taken earlier this year, 284 responding newspapers were planning to spend over $86 million on inserters and collators in 2005.