insectivorous


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Related to insectivorous: Insectivorous plants

in·sec·tiv·o·rous

(in'sek-tiv'ŏ-rŭs),
Insect-eating.
[insect + L. voro, to devour]

insectivorous

(ĭn′sĕk-tĭv′ər-əs)
adj.
Feeding on insects and other small invertebrates.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Only a few other predator groups such as spiders and entomophagous insects (including in particular predaceous ants) can keep up with the insectivorous birds in their capacity to suppress plant-eating insect populations on a global scale," he added.
Insectivorous bats that consume larger or hard-shelled preys tend to have big head, large gapes and tooth row, and a thicker jaw (Freeman, 1979; Fenton, 1988).
Insectivorous bats are known to play a major role in minimizing nocturnal insect population by consuming a major population (up to 100 % of their boy mass) in a single night (Kunz and Fenton, 2003).
Research on other benefits associated with field edge habitat, such as more insectivorous birds (Garfinkel and Johnson 2015) and water quality enhancement (Long et al.
The virus was detected in tongue (92 % and 85 %), brown fat (82 % and 77 %), lung (62 % and 77 %), heart (42 % and 77%), stomach (92 % and 64 %), liver (38 % and 67 %), spleen (43 % and 27 %), bladder (73 % and 88 %), kidney (77 % and 38 %), intestine tissues (77 % and 38 %), and feces (38 % and 42 %) from frugivorous and insectivorous bats.
Insectivorous birds as hoopoes (see in Schaub et al.
Previously reported observations of physical aggression in North American insectivorous bats.
A happy African wading bird with long legs and long toes, a Jay given to kidding around, a green tropical insectivorous bird with iridescent feathers, and a fancy tropical stork crowd together; a group of misfits in close proximity.
The system, based on physiology of the insectivorous horseshoe bat, involves dynamic echolocation.
Mammals from Tlaxmalac represented eight different feeding habits (Table 1), including omnivorous (n = 15, 36.6%), insectivorous (n = 10, 24.4%), frugivorous (n = 6, 14.6%), nectarivorous (n = 4, 9.8%), and herbivorous (n = 3, 7.4%), which were most abundant, as well as granivorous (Heteromys irroratus), hematophagous (Desmodus rotundus), and carnivorous (Leopardus weidii), which had only one species each (2.4%).