inscription

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inscription

 [in-skrip´shun]
1. a mark or line.
2. the second part of a prescription, the part containing names and amounts of the ingredients.

in·scrip·tion

(in-skrip'shŭn),
1. The main part of a prescription, that which indicates the drugs and the amount of each to be used in the mixture.
2. A mark, band, or line.
Synonym(s): inscriptio
[L. inscriptio]

inscription

/in·scrip·tion/ (-skrip´shun)
1. a mark, or line.
2. that part of a prescription containing the names and amounts of the ingredients.

in·scrip·tion

(in-skrip'shŭn)
1. The main part of a prescription; that which indicates the drugs and the quantity of each to be used in the mixture.
2. A mark, band, or line.

prescription

signed, written formula for a medicinal preparation, made out by a designated practitioner, and consisting of:
  • inscription names and amounts of drugs ordered

  • signature dose and times of dosing

  • subscription designated drug form

  • superscription recipient details

in·scrip·tion

, inscriptio (in-skrip'shŭn, -shē-ō)
The main part of a prescription, which indicates drugs and amount of each to be used in the mixture.

inscription

1. a mark or line.
2. that part of a prescription containing the names and amounts of the ingredients.
References in periodicals archive ?
The media of late modernity - visual or inscriptive - represent, for Lefort, the template for how ideology functions in our time.
All of which is to say that, at its most abstract level, like the play of grammar in language, structures of enduring meaning have to be understood in terms of dynamic possibility as well as axiological constraint, and as the inscribed limits to a transforming system of thought rather than as categorically inscriptive habitus.
To recall his remarkable discussion of the Medusa in Shelley, the event-like inscriptive force of language is, in effect, a face into which one cannot look, and one cannot not look.
I was very impressed with Derrida's ability to demonstrate the textual, inscriptive, and institutional practices of deferral and displacement.
Yet this inscriptive gesture also destabilized the very "history" it sought to uphold.
This inscriptive aspect of the revised passage is noted by Kneale, Monumental Writing, pp.
The specularly disturbing, paranoia-prompting uncertainties of author and reader brought about by both inscriptive frame and inscribed content leads to a recontainment of disruptive effects by returning to a kind of materiality in the same moment of its flickering virtuality.
If that alternative economy of inscriptive and interpretive practices is, as I have argued above, capable of being used for the construction of 'history' as well as 'myth', it seems likely (and is strongly suggested by my Pigeon example) that 'history' in this alternative mode will not be the simple equivalent of the literary sort, but that it too will be 'different again'.