inosinate


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in·o·si·nate

(in-ō'si-nāt),
A salt or ester of inosinic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Application of lysine, taurine, disodium inosinate and disodium guanylate in fermented cooked sausages with 50% replacement of NaCl by KCl.
Pollonio, "Lysine, disodium guanylate and disodium inosinate as flavor enhancers in low-sodium fermented sausages," Meat Science, vol.
* Monosodium glutamate, disodium guanylate, and disodium inosinate: Intensify flavor but may cause sensitivity reactions, such as headaches, in some people.
6-Mercaptopurine passes into the fetal circulation but fetal liver lacks the enzyme inosinate pyrophosphorylase required for the conversion to active metabolite thioinosinic acid and therefore the fetus is protected from its adverse effect [41].
Sample matrices included pasteurized 1% milk and beef bouillon (ingredients: beef broth (water, beef stock), yeast extract, salt, flavour, salted onion juice, caramel, disodium inosinate, and disodium guanylate), purchased from a local grocer, and the microbial growth medium brain heart infusion (BHI) broth (ingredients per litre: 12.5 g brain infusion solids, 5.0 g beef heart infusion solids, 10.0 g proteose peptone, 2.0 g glucose, 5.0 g sodium chloride, and 2.5 g disodium phosphate) (Oxoid CM1135, Ottawa, ON).
Glutamate--an amino acid found naturally in many foods, from meats to vegetables--and specific nucleotides (structural units of DNA) like inosinate, found in meat, guanylate from plants, and adenylate in fish, are compounds that contribute to the umami taste.
If you're buying powdered stock or using stock cubes, check the ingredients and ignore those that have salt, monosodium glutamate, disodium guanylate, disodium inosinate, or similar, or other flavour enhancers as their main ingredients (the first item on a product's list of ingredients is the main one by volume, the second ingredient the second by volume and so on).
The umami sensation, technically due to the presence of several amino acids and nucleotides including aspirate, inosinate and glutamate, can also develop through ripening, drying, curing, aging, cooking, and fermenting (Marcus, 2005).
Salt Sea salt Garlic salt Onion salt Seasoned salt Celery salt Baking powder Baking soda Sodium bicarbonate Monosodium glutamate Sodium fluoride Sodium acid pyrophosphate Sodium aluminum phosphate Sodium meta bisulfite Calcium disodium EDTA Disodium guanylate Disodium inosinate Sodium biphenyl-2-yl oxide Sodium formate Sodium acetate Sodium diacetate Sodium ascorbate Sodium erythorbate Sodium tartarates Sodium potassium tartarates Sodium orthophosphates Sodium maleate Sodium alginate Sodium & potassium polyphosphates Sodium carboxymethylcellulose Dioctyl sodium sulphosuccinate Sodium carbonate Sodium aluminum phosphate Sodium aluminum silicate Sodium citrate Sodium sulfite Sodium caseinate Sodium benzoate Sodium sorbate Sodium nitrate Sodium nitrite Sodium bisulfite