phosphate

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phosphate

 [fos´fāt]
any salt or ester of phosphoric acid. adj., adj phosphat´ic.

Phosphates are widely distributed in the body, the largest amounts being in the bones and teeth. They are continually excreted in the urine and feces and must be replaced in the diet. Inorganic phosphates function as buffer salts to maintain the acid-base balance in blood, saliva, urine, and other body fluids. The principal phosphates in this buffer system are monosodium and disodium phosphate. Organic phosphates, in particular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), take part in a series of reversible reactions involving phosphoric acid, lactic acid, glycogen, and other substances, which furnish the energy expended in muscle contraction. This is thought to occur through the hydrolysis of the so-called high-energy phosphate bond present in ATP, phosphocreatine, and certain other body compounds.

phos·phate (P),

(fos'fāt),
A salt or ester of phosphoric acid. For individual phosphates not listed here, see under the name of the base.

phosphate

/phos·phate/ (fos´fāt) any salt or ester of phosphoric acid.phosphat´ic

phosphate (PO43-)

[fos′fāt]
1 an anion of phosphoric acid.
2 a salt of phosphoric acid. Phosphates are extremely important in living cells, particularly in the storage and use of energy and the transmission of genetic information within a cell and from one cell to another. See also adenosine diphosphate, adenosine triphosphate, phosphorus.

phos·phate

(fos'fāt)
1. A salt or ester (especially inorganic) of phosphoric acid.
2. The trivalent ion, PO43-.

phosphate

any salt or ester of any PHOSPHORIC ACID.

Phosphate

An organic compound necessary for mineralization of bone and other key cellular processes.
Mentioned in: Hyperparathyroidism

phosphate

any salt or ester of phosphoric acid.
1. Phosphates are widely distributed in the body, the largest amounts being in the bones and teeth. They are continually excreted in the urine and feces, and must be replaced in the diet. Inorganic phosphates function as buffer salts to maintain the acid-base balance in blood, saliva, urine and other body fluids. The principal phosphates in this buffer system are monosodium and disodium phosphate. Organic phosphates, in particular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), are used to store the chemical bond energy released during the oxidation of compounds such as glycogen or fatty acids, which may later be expended in muscle contraction. This is thought to occur through the hydrolysis of the so-called high-energy phosphate bond present in ATP, phosphocreatine and certain other body compounds. See also hypophosphatemia, hyperphosphatemia.
2. used extensively in agricultural industry as fertilizers and organic compounds as cleaning agents.

phosphate binders
usually aluminum carbonate or hydroxide preparations, used to bind phosphates and limit their absorption from the intestine. Used in the treatment of the hyperphosphatemia of renal failure.
phosphate buffer
important phosphate-containing buffers.
phosphate buffered saline
a special phosphate buffered saline used in tissue cultures and for the storage and transport of bovine embryos. Abbreviated PBS.
phosphate calculi
see struvite urolith.
dietary phosphate
supplementation of the diet with phosphate in some form is a very common practice in farm animals. Materials used include rock phosphate (defluorination may be necessary), sodium dihydrogen phosphate produced by the agricultural chemical industry, calcium triphosphate and bone meal or flour.
inorganic phosphate
any salt of phosphoric acid.
phosphate retention
a phenomenon resulting from reduced glomerular filtration; contributes to a chronic hypocalcemic state.
phosphate ridge
see mineralization front.
phosphate rock
phosphate yielding endonucleases
a class of ribonuclease involved in the usually fairly rapid turnover of RNA in the cell that degrades RNA by cleavage of the phosphodiester bonds within the molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of nitrogen source on solubilization of different inorganic phosphates by an isolate of Pencillium rugulosum and two UV-induced mutants.
The rate of transfer of phosphate group to phosphate acceptors was also increased while the amount of inorganic phosphate (Pi) produced, remained same and was equal to the amount of Pi released in water when no alcohol was added (Table-3).
2008) also reported in their studies that inorganic phosphates in the culture medium can be involved in the various cellular metabolic activities e.
Since the introduction of casein cultivation in concentrations of 1-2 g/l into the medium had a positive influence on accumulation of activity of the extracellular enzyme and productivity of the culture, we performed a two-factor experiment in order to determine the optimal concentrations of casein and inorganic phosphate (Figure 4), Casein and inorganic phosphate was varied in three levels: casein--0.
Spectrophotometric quantification of serum inorganic phosphate concentrations may give falsely increased results owing to immunoglobulin precipitation.
1987) Effect of inorganic phosphate in hypoxemic chronic obstructive lung disease patients during exercise.
International Symposium on Inorganic Phosphate Materials: Phosphate Materials for Energy Storage (7th: 2011: Argonne, Illinois) Ed.
Our research has focused on using thiourea derivatized polymer flocculants for the removal of inorganic phosphate in water.
Average median levels of dissolved inorganic phosphate dropped 93 percent, and average median levels of total organic phosphate dropped 87 percent.
They are a unique class of phosphatases that catalyze the stepwise hydrolysis of phytate to lower inositol phosphate esters and inorganic phosphate (Oh et al.
Hybrid inorganic phosphate glass-polymer materials belong to a relatively new class of advanced materials that provide a facile route, via molecular-scale (i.