inoperable

(redirected from inoperability)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

inoperable

 [in-op´er-ah-b'l]
not susceptible to treatment by surgery.

in·op·er·a·ble

(in-op'ĕr-ă-bĕl), Avoid confusing this word with inoperative.
Denoting that which cannot be operated on, or a condition that cannot likely be cured by surgery.

inoperable

(ĭn-ŏp′ər-ə-bəl, -ŏp′rə-)
adj.
1. Not functioning; inoperative.
2. Unsuitable for a surgical procedure: an inoperable tumor.

in·op′er·a·bil′i·ty n.
in·op′er·a·bly adv.

inoperable

adjective Referring to a Pt's condition, especially, a disseminated CA, that won't benefit from surgery

in·op·er·a·ble

(in-op'ĕr-ă-bĕl)
Denoting a condition that which cannot be operated on, or cannot be corrected or removed by an operation.

inoperable

Referring to the stage in a disease, normally treated by surgery, beyond which surgery is not feasible or useful. The term is commonly applied to cancer that has spread widely. Many conditions once universally considered inoperable are now treated by surgery.
References in periodicals archive ?
(275) Furthermore, whatever the difficulties surrounding enablement's overlap with inoperability, they appear neatly resolved when considering Prempro's patent: because the patented method produces the opposite effect of what it intended, the claims ultimately required an impossible, "nonsensical method of operation." (276)
Some courts might check the statute's design for suggestions of legal inoperability, but here, the tax-cut provision does not affect the legal operability of the museum-funding provision.
AANC's effective lobbying resulted in a change-out requirement only when an alarm is replaced for inoperability or other reasons.
Their inoperability is underscored by the issue of whether individual governments preoccupied in their own state-centred approaches even wish to recognise civil society actors as equal partners (Shilimela, 2008: 9, 14, 31).
This kind of dust can increase the air-side pressure drop rapidly and clog the heat exchangers to the point of inoperability.
The Army needs to implement formal training on foreign weapons for three reasons -- first, to ensure that our Soldiers are prepared when serving as advisors or as part of a training team tasked with enabling foreign forces (such as the Afghan National Army or Iraqi National Police) to become more professional; second, to help leaders understand their environment, the enemy, and the enemy's capabilities; and third, to provide Soldiers the ability to use the enemy's weapons against him in time of need (e.g., the inoperability of an individual weapon or the depletion of ammunition).
The use of "config-trial" functions, which allow temporary settings for configuration specifications, enables users to avoid inoperability resulting from errors in settings when working from remote locations.
(12.) On affinities between Keats's negative capability, the Kantian aesthetic, Heideggerian attention, and inoperability, see Tilottama Rajan, "Keats, Poetry, and 'The Absence of the Work,'" Modern Philology 9 (1998), especially 344.
But corporate capital has possibly a preferred alternative--a formal statute heralding fair play but one reduced to inoperability. The one notable success of s.46 was a 1989 High Court judgement against steel monopoly BHP for refusing to supply Y-bar to Queensland Wire for the manufacture of fence posts (Queensland Wire Industries v Broken Hill Pty, 1989).
the BRCAness profile is clinical use, the potential of assay inoperability due to an inability to license individual biomarkers should be considered from the earliest stages ofdevelopment.
paper file, but they are limited by their inoperability with other