numeracy

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numeracy

Mathematical literacy Neurology The ability to understand mathematical concepts, perform calculations and interpret and use statistical information. Cf Acalculia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Innumeracy is an issue we must confront: numerical information is
But widespread innumeracy draws this claim into question.
In the first half of the book, he synthesizes knowledge on the property of words, notions of logic and logical fallacies, common forms of innumeracy, issues of probability and statistics, and manipulations of forms of data presentation (such as graphs that use the same data but visually tell different stories).
Despite increased reliance on technology, much of the general public has very little understanding of basic tenets of science--the phenomenon described as scientific illiteracy and innumeracy.
The more charitable would put it down to his innumeracy.
With reference to several of the sonnets that seem to play deliberately with innumeracy (e.
started thinking about the nature and extent of the innumeracy that seems to pervade the media and, worse, appears to go largely unremarked upon.
Their innumeracy and lack of understanding about tradeoffs among different sources of risk make them highly susceptible to misleading information from those who regularly raise false alarms and demand that regulators ban, withdraw, limit, and restrict many useful products.
Another researcher thinks that mathematics anxiety plays a role in the development of symptoms of innumeracy even when psychological intervention can provide a certain degree of remediation (Ashcraft, 1995).
Mr Brown vowed to wipe out innumeracy among 11-year-olds as he set out his plans.
Elsewhere this article has been used to illustrate innumeracy in the press (Watson, 2004) but the point here was to model, with counters or otherwise, the increase in the allowed number of flies and describe it as a percent increase.
Consistent findings from decades of media research have generated concern about the negative consequences, for some children, of uncontrolled exposure to the electronic media, including heightened aggression, obesity, illiteracy, innumeracy, or poor social skills.