innominate artery


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Related to innominate artery: innominate vein

in·nom·i·nate ar·ter·y

innominate artery

n.
See brachiocephalic artery.

innominate artery

one of the three arteries branching from the arch of the aorta, running about 5 cm from the level of the cranial border of the second right costal cartilage; ascending cranially, dorsally, and obliquely to the right; and dividing into the right common carotid and the right subclavian arteries. Also called brachiocephalic artery, brachiocephalic trunk.

brachiocephalic trunk

A major branch of the aortic arch which divides into the right subclavian and right common carotid arteries, occasionally giving rise to the thyroid ima artery.

in·nom·i·nate ar·te·ry

(i-nom'i-năt ahr'tĕr-ē)
Obsolete term for brachiocephalic trunk

innominate artery

A major, unpaired, artery that arises from the arch of the aorta, towards the right side of the body, and immediately divides into the right subclavian and right carotid arteries.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the rare complications of tracheostomy is fistula formation between the trachea and the innominate artery.
The innominate artery is involved in 80% of the cases due to its close anatomic relation to the anterior surface of trachea1 (Figure-1).
It involves the destruction of the anterior wall of the trachea and the posterior wall of the innominate artery.
If the above measures fail, digital compressions of the innominate artery through the tracheostomy tract should be performed.
The mass was dissected freely down to the innominate artery and into the posterior mediastinum where the medial attachments were divided.
In summary, subclavian steal syndrome is blood flow reversal in vertebral arteries usually caused by severe stenosis of the subclavian artery or innominate artery.
Tracheal resection and anastomosis is a technically difficult operation that carries the risk of life-threatening complications, including suture-line dehiscence, innominate artery erosion, and wound infection.
Reinforcing the suture line with fibrin glue adds strength to the line, creates an airtight seal, isolates the innominate artery from the anastomosis, and provides a medium for the local delivery of antibiotics.