innominate artery


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Related to innominate artery: innominate vein

in·nom·i·nate ar·ter·y

innominate artery

n.
See brachiocephalic artery.

innominate artery

one of the three arteries branching from the arch of the aorta, running about 5 cm from the level of the cranial border of the second right costal cartilage; ascending cranially, dorsally, and obliquely to the right; and dividing into the right common carotid and the right subclavian arteries. Also called brachiocephalic artery, brachiocephalic trunk.

brachiocephalic trunk

A major branch of the aortic arch which divides into the right subclavian and right common carotid arteries, occasionally giving rise to the thyroid ima artery.

in·nom·i·nate ar·te·ry

(i-nom'i-năt ahr'tĕr-ē)
Obsolete term for brachiocephalic trunk

innominate artery

A major, unpaired, artery that arises from the arch of the aorta, towards the right side of the body, and immediately divides into the right subclavian and right carotid arteries.
References in periodicals archive ?
Innominate artery reimplantation to a more proximal region of the aorta was planned, and a median sternotomy incision was performed.
Key Words: airway obstruction, innominate artery, tracheal compression
This report describes a case of innominate artery compression of the trachea first diagnosed in a patient at 12 years of age and requiring repeat surgery to ameliorate the symptoms.
There is no consensus as to why some patients are more prone to symptomatic innominate artery compression of the trachea; however, Berdon et al (4) suggested that innominate artery syndrome is more likely to arise in patients with a "crowded" superior mediastinum, such as in those patients with congenital heart disease.
By 3 years of age, growth of the aortic arch causes the innominate artery to move cephalad, to the right, and anteriorly, away from the trachea.
Diagnosis of innominate artery compression of the trachea in patients presenting with symptoms of airway obstruction can be presumed with chest radiographs and bronchoscopy, which often shows a pulsatile anterior compression of the trachea a few centimeters above the carina.
The majority of patients with innominate artery compression of the trachea are successfully treated with medical management, which generally includes humidified oxygen, steroids, and antibiotics, as required.