innervate

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innervate

(ĭ-nûr′vāt′, ĭn′ər-)
tr.v. inner·vated, inner·vating, inner·vates
1. To supply (an organ or a body part) with nerves.
2. To stimulate (a nerve, muscle, or body part) to action.

in′ner·va′tion n.
in′ner·va′tion·al (-vā′shə-nəl) adj.

innervate

(ĭn-nĕr′vāt) (ĭn′ĕr-vāt) [″ + nervus, nerve]
1. To send axons to synapse with another structure (as in, “a motor nerve innervates a muscle”).
2. To send axons to receive signals from a structure (as in, “a sensory nerve innervates the skin”).

innervate

  1. to supply nerves to (a bodily organ or part).
  2. to stimulate (a bodily organ or part) with nerve impulses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Final diagnosis of referred otalgia was made on positive findings in the other head and neck sites that share sensory innervation with the ear in conjunction with a "Normal on Examination" affected ear.
Innervation of Subclavius Muscle: An Anatomical Study
However, this is not reliable due to the variable innervation of this muscle.
AAEM minimonograph #2: important anomalous innervations of the extremities.
The authors recommend further studies involving the innervation pattern of posterior gastric nerve.
These results imply that NGF is required for tooth innervation and that other neurotro-phins may also have regulatory roles.
In summary, the goal of this paper is to test three predictions derived from Hering's law of equal innervation. The first prediction is that the bifixation field is smaller for near convergence distances than for far distances, owing to increasingly incongruent vergence and version innervations at nearer viewing distances.
• Muscle Fact spreads-- ideal for memorization, reference, and review--organize the essentials about muscles, including origin, insertion, innervation, and action
The new look into this area of human bladder innervations brings new ideas of how to approach voiding dysfunction and particularly OAB.
This mathematical evidence for a common drive as well as independent control of the rectus abdominis portions is consistent with neuroanatomical descriptions of rectus abdominis muscle innervations based on corpse dissection and electrical nerve stimulation (Duchateau et al., 1988; Hammond et al., 1995; Pradhan and Taly, 1989; Sakamoto et al., 1996).
The injection sites included areas over sensitive innervations.