inner speech


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

inner speech

The silent process of thought and production of unuttered words. This function is essential to thinking that is done with words. Synonym: endophasia
See also: speech
References in periodicals archive ?
Again we are in a world of inner speech. Here speaker and listener flow into each other's thoughts.
(2) Eisenstein read Vygotsky's work on inner speech, as he read Joyce, with a keen interest in its implications for film language.
Inner speech may be companionable or frightening, may range from fascinated eavesdropping on oneself to manic aural possession, encompassing the brooding censor within, furious interdictions, cajoling insistences, the white flash of conversion.
The same inner/outer issue recurred in a different way in Pierre Janet's explanation of verbal hallucinations, which held that hallucinations represented self-directed inner speech', automatic, partly subconscious and mistaken as the words of somebody else.
As a result of this assumption, it is concerned primarily with the part of the mind known as inner speech. It does not do justice to the complexity of the types of evidence for the workings of fictional minds that are available in narrative discourse, and it does not analyze what I shall variously call the whole mind, the social mind, and the mind in action.
The mistake in question happens when a person produces inner speech but, due to malfunctioning at the subpersonal level, does not recognize the speech she experiences.
"A predisposition to [hearing voices] might depend on abnormal activity in brain areas implicated in perceiving inner speech and in determining whether it is of self or alien origin," contend Philip K.
One problem with her exposition is that the author brushes, often repeatedly, against interesting and important issues: dialogue versus monologue, inner speech, I-Thou style (as in prayers, here treated as a sub-category of dialogue, pp.
UNSW Sydney scientist and study first author Associate Professor Thomas Whitford says it has long been thought that these auditory-verbal hallucinations arise from abnormalities in inner speech -- our silent internal dialogue.
Author Norbert Wiley (sociology, emeritus, University of Illinois-Urbana) takes a humanistic social theory approach to examine the phenomenon of inner speech (also known as self-talk, internal conversation, or inner dialogue).
Whereas traditional narratology has emphasized the internalist perspective through a preferred focus on a character's inner speech, Palmer points out that readers construct character consciousness based on "a bare minimum of information" by building throughout a narrative a "continuing-consciousness frame" (10).
It was identified that the method of "inner speech" is used in children with autism but not always in the same way as typically developing children do.