inlet patch

inlet patch

GI disease A remnant of heterotopic but normal glandular epithelium, usually gastric, which may be found in the esophagus of otherwise asymptomatic subjects, which may be an embryonic rest. See Barrett's esophagus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Incidental findings on TNE included 3 cases of gastritis, 2 cases each of hiatal hernia and esophagitis, 1 case of Barrett esophagus, and 1 inlet patch.
Incidental findings reported during TNE included 3 cases of gastritis, two cases each of hiatal hernia and esophagitis (including Candida esophagitis), 1 case of Barrett esophagus, and 1 inlet patch.
Upper esophagus should be carefully examined for presence of an inlet patch.
Esophageal inlet patch is considered a congenital anomaly, a remnant of gastric mucosa which is left behind during the descent of the stomach in embryologic development.
Inlet patch is easily overlooked on endoscopic examination, due to its location.
In this issue of the Southern Medical Journal, Chong et al report 5 cases of esophageal inlet patch presenting with various laryngeal and oropharyngeal symptoms, ranging from asymptomatic to protracted symptoms such as chronic cough.
Transnasal esophagoscopy revealed a 270 [degrees] degree inlet patch with an associated stricture.
An inlet patch can be diagnosed clinically based on the endoscopic appearance of a salmon-red patch demarcated from the surrounding pearl-gray esophageal mucosa (figure) and histologically by the presence of gastric-type mucosa.
Although a cervical inlet patch is not considered a premalignant lesion like Barrett metaplasia, it may be symptomatic and should be looked for during esophagoscopy.
Similarly, esophageal HGMP, also known as cervical inlet patch (CIP), has been increasingly reported.
3-5) Esophageal HGMP, also known as cervical inlet patch (CIP), is usually located just distal to the upper esophageal sphincter.
HGMP of the esophagus, or the cervical inlet patch, was first described by Schmidt (6) in 1805 as an aberrant gastric fundus-type epithelium located in the proximal esophagus.