injunction


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injunction

(ĭn-jŭnk′shŭn) [L. injungere, to fasten, join]
A court order prohibiting an individual from performing some act or demanding that a person begin to perform some act.
References in periodicals archive ?
The council took this injunction out to prevent repeated anti-social behaviour in the town.
"Mr Spencer has breached the conditions of the injunction on many occasions and therefore the only option was to once again pursue this in court.
The council used thelawyer who successfully secured the landmark traveller injunction in Harlow.
The barrister successfully won the leading case where the court granted the first borough-wide injunction .
He claimed that some losing bidders tend to file a case and seek court injunctions that only delay the implementation of the project.
A single caravan was spotted on privately owned land, however, the occupant was a named person covered by the injunction.
A County Court date was arranged for the next morning but was not required as all occupiers left after the police stepped in and told them about the injunction.
greater--to pursue a nationwide injunction. And to the extent that (as I
in settings where the absence of a nationwide injunction would be
"However, when we do get that support we are able to take a host of action and as a result of this injunction we have only had two calls of about antisocial behaviour compared to daily calls before it.
"You can be our eyes and ears on the ground and this injunction proves that we will use all the powers available to us to take action against those making people's lives a misery".
It proposes guidelines for determining in what circumstances "a preliminary injunction is in the public interest." (8) Part I explores the history of the preliminary injunction, with an emphasis on the flexibility employed by courts of equity.