mechanism

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mechanism

 [mek´ah-nizm]
1. a machine or machinelike structure.
2. the manner of combination of parts, processes, or other aspects that carry out a common function.
3. the theory that the phenomena of life are based on the same physical and chemical laws that govern inorganic matter, as opposed to vitalism.
coping m's conscious or unconscious strategies or mechanisms that a person uses to cope with stress or anxiety including turning to a comforting person for love and support, self-discipline, acting out or working off tension, talking and expressing feelings by crying or laughing, and also unconscious defense mechanisms, such as avoidance and rationalization.
defense mechanism see defense mechanism.

mech·a·nism

(mek'ă-nizm),
1. An arrangement or grouping of the parts of anything that has a definite action.
2. The means by which an effect is obtained.
3. The chain of events in a particular process.
4. The detailed description of a reaction pathway.
[G. mēchanē, a contrivance]

mechanism

Medspeak
The manner by which a process occurs; the arrangement or association of the elements or parts of a thing in relation to the effect generated.

Psychology
The combination of mental processes by which an effect is generated.

mechanism

Medtalk The manner by which a process occurs; the arrangement or association of the elements or parts of a thing in relation to the effect generated

mech·a·nism

(mek'ă-nizm)
1. An arrangement or grouping of the parts of anything that has a definite action.
2. The means by which an effect is obtained.
3. The chain of events in a particular process.
4. The detailed description of a reaction pathway.
5. biowarfare A device or part of one intended to release a biologic or chemical agent.
[G. mēchanē, a contrivance]

mech·a·nism

(mek'ă-nizm)
1. Arrangement or grouping of parts of anything that has a definite action.
2. Means by which an effect is obtained.
3. Chain of events in a particular process.
[G. mēchanē, a contrivance]

Patient discussion about mechanism

Q. How does an allergic response occur? I don’t understand the exact mechanism of allergies. Can someone explain this?

A. In the early stages of allergy, a type I hypersensitivity reaction against an allergen, encountered for the first time, causes a response in a type of immune cell called a TH2 lymphocyte, that interact with other lymphocytes called B cells, whose role is production of antibodies. The secreted IgE antibody circulates in the blood and binds to an IgE-specific receptor (a kind of Fc receptor called FceRI) on the surface of other kinds of immune cells called mast cells and basophils, which are both involved in the acute inflammatory response. The IgE-coated cells, at this stage are sensitized to the allergen. If later exposure to the same allergen occurs, the allergen can bind to the IgE molecules held on the surface of the mast cells or basophils and cause a full reaction.

More discussions about mechanism