inhibition

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inhibition

 [in″hĭ-bish´un]
1. arrest or restraint of a process.
2. in psychoanalysis, the conscious or unconscious restraining of an impulse or desire. adj., adj inhib´itory.
competitive inhibition inhibition of enzyme activity by an inhibitor (a substrate analogue) that competes with the substrate for binding sites on the enzymes.
contact inhibition inhibition of cell division and cell motility in normal animal cells when in close contact with each other.
noncompetitive inhibition inhibition of enzyme activity by substances that combine with the enzyme at a site other than that utilized by the substrate.

in·hi·bi·tion

(in'hi-bi'shŭn),
1. Depression or arrest of a function.
See also: inhibitor.
2. In psychoanalysis, the restraining of instinctive or unconscious drives or tendencies, especially if they conflict with one's conscience or with societal demands.
3. In psychology, a generic term for a variety of processes associated with the gradual attenuation, masking, and extinction of a previously conditioned response.
4. The reduction of the rate of a reaction or process.
[L. inhibeo, pp. -hibitus, to keep back, fr. habeo, to have]

inhibition

(ĭn′hə-bĭsh′ən, ĭn′ə-)
n.
1. The act of inhibiting or the state of being inhibited.
2. Something that restrains, blocks, or suppresses.
3. Psychology Conscious or unconscious restraint of a behavioral process, desire, or impulse.
4.
a. Chemistry The condition in which or the process by which a reaction is inhibited.
b. Biology The condition in which or the process by which an enzyme, for example, is inhibited.

inhibition

Psychiatry Behavior that reflects an unconscious defense against forbidden instinctive drives, which may interfere with or restrict specific activities. See Competitive inhibition, Disinhibition, Enzyme inhibition, Feedback inhibition, Multidrug-resistance inhibition, Outlaw inhibition, Postsynaptic inhibition, Presymptomatic inhibition, Reciprocal inhibition.

in·hi·bi·tion

(in'hi-bish'ŭn)
1. Depression or arrest of a function.
See also: inhibitor
2. psychoanalysis The restraining of instinctual or unconscious drives or tendencies, especially if they conflict with one's conscience or with societal demands.
3. psychology The gradual attenuation, masking, and extinction of a previously conditioned response.
[L. inhibeo, pp. -hibitus, to keep back, fr. habeo, to have]

inhibition

Arrest or limitation of a function or activity.

inhibition

a state in which an enzyme is unable to catalyse reactions. See COMPETITIVE INHIBITION and NONCOMPETITIVE INHIBITION.

Inhibition

Referring to the moment in an Alexander lesson when the student refrains from beginning a movement in order to avoid tensing of the muscles.

in·hi·bi·tion

(in'hi-bish'ŭn)
1. Depression or arrest of a function.
See also: inhibitor
2. Reduction of rate of reaction or process.
[L. inhibeo, pp. -hibitus, to keep back, fr. habeo, to have]
References in periodicals archive ?
Percentage of inhibition (efficacy): The percentage of inhibition (efficacy) for each fungicide in Petri dishes was calculated according to the following formula (Amer, 1995):
scoparia on Urease Inhibition. Urease inhibition caused by the aqueous fraction of A.
Six hundred and ninety-one (21.38%) of the HPA samples and 29 (5.56%) of the PHLS samples produced percentage inhibition of [greater than or equal to] 20% in the inhibition ELISA test (Table).
Since a large amount of NO generated by induced iNOS upon stimulation of endotoxins or cytokins is implicated in pathological responses at the quantities of nM (Nevin et al., 2002), inhibition of iNOS is very important to control inflammatory diseases.
As shown in Figure 3, the nature of the samples did not modify the recognition of brevetoxins by the antibody, evidenced by the identical inhibition curves for biologic matrices and buffer controls.
A climate of communal and familial intolerance was also found to breed feelings of inhibition and self-censorship in order to 'avoid arguments,' to avoid 'making enemies,' because others might think their views are 'strange,' because they are concerned about 'what others think,' or because they worry that the 'government might find out.' In particular, Gibson finds that blacks were more reluctant than whites to speak about politics.
Keywords: Vanadium(V) Hydrazide Complex, Enzyme Inhibition, Tyrosinase, Carbonic Anhydrase.
In the first set of experiments, we exposed PC12 and C6 cells to chlorpyrifos or chlorpyrifos metabolites for 1 hr in the absence of serum, to obviate any potential protective effect of serum proteins (11,18,28,29), selecting a chlorpyrifos concentration (30 [micro]M) previously found to cause robust but submaximal inhibition of DNA synthesis in vitro (1,18).
Of the 56 sera studied, 38 were clearly positive by [sub.125]I assay, and the same 38 were clearly positive by ELISA (inhibition of TSH binding >15% in both assays).
However, there is a great scarcity of literature concerning other biological activities such as enzyme inhibition and antidiabetic properties of Pd(II) complexes, particularly with nitrogen donor ligands; it provided us enough momentum to ensue in this direction.
aeruginosa was found more susceptible to ethyl acetate fraction with inhibition of 69.5 %, while B.

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