inhibition


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Related to inhibition: zone of inhibition

inhibition

 [in″hĭ-bish´un]
1. arrest or restraint of a process.
2. in psychoanalysis, the conscious or unconscious restraining of an impulse or desire. adj., adj inhib´itory.
competitive inhibition inhibition of enzyme activity by an inhibitor (a substrate analogue) that competes with the substrate for binding sites on the enzymes.
contact inhibition inhibition of cell division and cell motility in normal animal cells when in close contact with each other.
noncompetitive inhibition inhibition of enzyme activity by substances that combine with the enzyme at a site other than that utilized by the substrate.

in·hi·bi·tion

(in'hi-bi'shŭn),
1. Depression or arrest of a function.
See also: inhibitor.
2. In psychoanalysis, the restraining of instinctive or unconscious drives or tendencies, especially if they conflict with one's conscience or with societal demands.
3. In psychology, a generic term for a variety of processes associated with the gradual attenuation, masking, and extinction of a previously conditioned response.
4. The reduction of the rate of a reaction or process.
[L. inhibeo, pp. -hibitus, to keep back, fr. habeo, to have]

inhibition

(ĭn′hə-bĭsh′ən, ĭn′ə-)
n.
1. The act of inhibiting or the state of being inhibited.
2. Something that restrains, blocks, or suppresses.
3. Psychology Conscious or unconscious restraint of a behavioral process, desire, or impulse.
4.
a. Chemistry The condition in which or the process by which a reaction is inhibited.
b. Biology The condition in which or the process by which an enzyme, for example, is inhibited.

inhibition

Psychiatry Behavior that reflects an unconscious defense against forbidden instinctive drives, which may interfere with or restrict specific activities. See Competitive inhibition, Disinhibition, Enzyme inhibition, Feedback inhibition, Multidrug-resistance inhibition, Outlaw inhibition, Postsynaptic inhibition, Presymptomatic inhibition, Reciprocal inhibition.

in·hi·bi·tion

(in'hi-bish'ŭn)
1. Depression or arrest of a function.
See also: inhibitor
2. psychoanalysis The restraining of instinctual or unconscious drives or tendencies, especially if they conflict with one's conscience or with societal demands.
3. psychology The gradual attenuation, masking, and extinction of a previously conditioned response.
[L. inhibeo, pp. -hibitus, to keep back, fr. habeo, to have]

inhibition

Arrest or limitation of a function or activity.

inhibition

a state in which an enzyme is unable to catalyse reactions. See COMPETITIVE INHIBITION and NONCOMPETITIVE INHIBITION.

Inhibition

Referring to the moment in an Alexander lesson when the student refrains from beginning a movement in order to avoid tensing of the muscles.

in·hi·bi·tion

(in'hi-bish'ŭn)
1. Depression or arrest of a function.
See also: inhibitor
2. Reduction of rate of reaction or process.
[L. inhibeo, pp. -hibitus, to keep back, fr. habeo, to have]
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet, some studies have shown that other measures, like delay discounting (Solanto et al., 2001) or IQ (Horn, Dolan, Elliott, Deakin, & Woodruff, 2003) are better predictors of self-reported questionnaires' scores than response inhibition measures.
coli was most susceptible to ethylacetate fraction with inhibitory zones 15 mm percent affect 60%, followed by MBHE, n-butanol and aqueous one with inhibitory zones of 12, 11 and 8 mm respectively, while percent inhibition of these fractions were 48, 44, and 32% respectively.
The Prosecution has requested to be given five days to file their Motion for Reconsideration on Navarro's inhibition from hearing De Lima's case.
Table-2: Inhibition Zone produced by ethanolic extracts of leaf and stem of Cissampelos pareira and antimycotic against fungal strains (mm).
Dual FAAH and MAGL inhibition might play a key role in visceral pain.
To study the effect of proteasome inhibition on AP-1 activation, the RPE cells were cultured in the presence or absence of MG132 (10 [micro]M) for 1, 2, 4, and 8h, nuclear extracts were prepared, and electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays were performed for AP-1 binding.
Determination of Relative percentage Inhibition: The relative percentage inhibition of the test samples was calculated using the following formula with respect to positive control (Ajay et al., 2003; Kumar et al., 2010).
In clinical practice, the use of thromboelastography (TEG) as a detection tool plays an important role in evaluating platelet activity and can indicate the efficacy of antiplatelet treatment in patients with coronary heart disease or aspirin or clopidogrel resistance.[sup][5] This study performed TEG to examine changes in platelet aggregation inhibition rates before and after hemodialysis, to investigate whether hemodialysis affects the efficacy of dual antiplatelet agents (aspirin and clopidogrel) in uremic patients with coronary heart disease.
This reduced conditioned response derived from the effect of pre-exposures is known as latent inhibition, and it seems to be a mechanism that allows organisms to attenuate responses to possibly inconsequential stimuli (De la Casa & Lubow, 1995; Lubow & Weiner, 2010; Schmajuk, Lam, & Gray, 1996).
The efficacy of the fungicides was expressed as per cent inhibition of mycelial growth over control which was calculated by using the formula of Vincent (1927).