spasticity

(redirected from inherited neonatal spasticity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

spasticity

 [spas-tis´ĭ-te]
continuous resistance to stretching by a muscle due to abnormally increased tension, with heightened deep tendon reflexes.
clasp-knife spasticity clasp-knife rigidity.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

spas·tic·i·ty

(spas-tis'i-tē),
One type of increase in muscle tone at rest; characterized by increased resistance to passive stretch, velocity dependent and asymmetric about joints (that is, greater in the flexor muscles at the elbow and the extensor muscles at the knee). Exaggerated deep tendon reflexes and clonus are additional manifestations.
See also: clasp-knife spasticity.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

spasticity

 Neurology A velocity-dependent ↑ in tonic stretch reflexes–involuntary muscle contraction, most common in Pts with spinal cord lesions above the conus medullarisis, developing months after spinal cord injury Management Baclofen, which potentiates GABA's inhibitory effect on reflexes
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

spas·tic·i·ty

(spas-tis'i-tē)
A state of increased muscular tone with exaggeration of the tendon reflexes.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

spasticity

Rigidity in muscles causing stiffness and restriction of movement. Spasticity may or may not be associated with paralysis or muscle weakness. Spasticity with paralysis is a feature of many cases of STROKE. It occurs in SPASTIC PARALAYSIS (cerebral palsy) and sometimes in MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Spasticity

Increased mucle tone, or stiffness, which leads to uncontrolled, awkward movements.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

spas·tic·i·ty

(spas-tis'i-tē)
Type of increase in muscle tone at rest; characterized by increased resistance to passive stretch; velocity dependent and asymmetric about joints.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about spasticity

Q. Do you want to end because of a vaccination in a wheel chair? It is already about 12 years ago. I met a mother with her kids. One came always in a wheel chair to the services. His terrible story is still in my mind. It could be shown, that because of a vaccination he got the cytomegalovirus infection (CMV) and then spastic paralysis.

A. Corrigendum: If you know somebody speaking German and English who could...

More discussions about spasticity
This content is provided by iMedix and is subject to iMedix Terms. The Questions and Answers are not endorsed or recommended and are made available by patients, not doctors.
Full browser ?