inherent

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in·her·ent

(in-her'ent),
Occurring as a natural part or consequence; latent imminent; intrinsic.
[L. inhaerens, sticking to, adhering]

in·her·ent

(in-her'ĕnt)
Occurring as a natural part or consequence; intrinsic.
[L. inhaerens, sticking to, adhering]

inherent

Of a quality or part, existing naturally or intrinsically.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, through inherence, from a sentence of form A is BCD, we can
In contrast to this reading, I demonstrate in what follows that Spinoza is concerned with affirming rather than denying the reality of both modes and affects, and that in each case the affirmation is carried out differently, that is, through the employment of a different notion of affection, while the meaning of inherence remains the same.
Regarding the categories of relation examined by Kant, the ideas of inherence, causality, and community arise from the conjugation of identity and difference: because time exists and reality is subject to change, its elements establish interactions and lose the impassibility that would define a static and closed universe (eternal, non-temporal, and incorruptible).
A five factors based authentication system is based on the three factors frequently used (knowledge, possession and inherence), plus location and time.
The focus is upon allowing the individual to see the life opening opportunities offered by the trauma--enabling them to recognise they can choose from a range of potential responses (what Harmand et al., 1993: p 284 describe as 'he inherence of freedom and responsibility')
The comparative dimension counterbalances the investigation of standard representations created by society regarding the former soldiers, eliminating, in some respects, the supposed existence of a conspiracy connected by the society exclusively against veterans, rejecting the inherence of culpability, ingratitude, victimization (46).
Thus, perhaps now it is possible to flow one more time with the eminent classical text Mahabharata and, on the grounds of the maternal transcendental, to note more precisely the inextricable inherence of this maternal in all events, such that it needs no extrinsic legitimation, as shall be seen in selected films.
(3) Inherence factors, such as a biometric characteristic.
(At the time of his death, he was completing 24 Frames, consisting of two dozen four-and-a-half-minute plans sequences about canonical paintings and photographs.) Like Eric Rohmer, with whom the Iranian had many surprising affinities, including an almost mystical belief in realism and its inherence in objects present on set but invisible to the camera, in the use of a minimal crew when possible, and in the incorporation of chance encounters and accidents during filming, Kiarostami found pleasure in attenuations, temps morts, and the inconsequential.
For all comparisons, the recessive inherence model was the best according Akaike information criteria (AIC).
Ironically, celebrating the femme fatale complex has resulted in an even deeper inherence of misogyny.