inhalant abuse


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to inhalant abuse: huffing

inhalant abuse

The deliberate inhalation of dusts, gases, gasolines, paints, solvents or other chemicals in order to alter perception or consciousness. Many inhalants used for this purpose may damage the upper or lower respiratory tracts or cause brief or long-lasting injuries to the central nervous system.
See also: abuse
References in periodicals archive ?
Inhalant abuse is also related to car or motor vehicle accidents, leading to physical injuries not only to abuser but also for other participants in traffic, ending with driver's license loss and other more criminal charges (5).
If the parent suspects inhalant abuse then they can look out for the following signs which include strange chemical odors from breath, clothing, clothes dirtied with chemicals or paints, empty spray paint cans or rags soaked with chemicals found to be hidden.
Concerns have been expressed over the validity of existing criteria for inhalant abuse and inhalant dependence.
There were no significant differences observed among levels of inhalant abuse within the five most common services.
Nationally, in 2004/2005, inhalant abuse was more common among 8th graders than marijuana.
We should not view inhalant abuse [simply] as a substance abuse problem," Weiss says.
This article, the second installment in this year's edition of Heads Up: Real News About Drugs and Your Body, will alert your students to the real dangers of inhalant abuse and explain to them why the smart choice is never to try inhalants--not even once.
More importantly, our results show promise in treating inhalant abuse as it continues to grow as a problem among adolescents.
An early review of the inhalant abuse literature conducted by Barnes (1979) noted the high levels of use among Native-Indians, which he attributed to the acculturation stress associated with members of these groups.
This brochure is aimed at helping Asian American and Pacific Islander adults communicate with young people about the consequences of inhalant abuse.
Physical signs of inhalant abuse include unusual breath odor or chemical odor on clothing, spots or sores around the mouth, nausea or loss of appetite, slurred speech, dazed appearance, and red or runny eyes or nose.
Addictions and Native Americans presents a review of the current state of knowledge on the prevalence, nature, causes, and treatment of addictions (primarily alcohol abuse, with limited reference to inhalant abuse and gambling addiction) among Native Americans in the United States.