ingest

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ingest

(ĭn-jĕst′)
tr.v. in·gested, in·gesting, in·gests
To take into the body by the mouth for digestion or absorption.

in·gest′i·ble adj.
in·ges′tion n.
in·ges′tive adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is evident that paraffin ingestion and burns remain common preventable childhood injuries.
The family friend (patient F) visited an ED 2 days after ingestion of the mushrooms, complaining of abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.
Foreign body ingestion is a common problem all over the world with 80% of the case reported in children.
Three months after discharge from hospital, the patient was readmitted with a foreign body ingestion.
Ingestion was accidental in 19 (38%) and was with intent of suicide or self-harm in 31(62%) patients.
Most ingestions are uncomplicated, but if the battery becomes lodged in the oesophagus, children can experience complications including oesophageal burns (due to the discharge of electric current causing a build up of caustic soda (sodium hydroxide), perforations (secondary to liquefaction necrosis), fistula formation, pressure necrosis (due to prolonged pressure on the oesophageal tissues), leakage of the battery contents with direct corrosive damage, catastrophic oesophageal haemorrhage, heavy metal absorption (causing systemic poisoning), and rarely death (Chouhan et al, 2011; McConnell, 2013).
Foreign body ingestion is relatively frequently seen in children particularly those between the ages of 6 months and 3 years.
Speaking to Khaleej Times about the report, Dr Bharwani, noted the significant drop in the incidence of household chemical ingestion (40 per cent) and the increase in medication and cosmetics poisoning (60 per cent).
The patient vehemently denied intentional ingestion of rat or mouse poison.
Donnelly has identified 19 cases of inadvertent stay-tab ingestion at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center over a 16-year period from 1993 to 2009.
Sixty-six percent of the study visits were related to unsupervised ingestions, which is significantly higher than the 47% of emergency department visits related to unsupervised ingestions of other medications.
Most of the ingestions (60%) were accidental, or represented suicide attempts, Dr.