ingestion

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ingestion

 [in-jes´chun]
the taking of food, drugs, liquids, or other substances into the body by mouth.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·ges·tion

(in-jes'chŭn),
1. Introduction of food and drink into the stomach.
2. Incorporation of particles into the cytoplasm of a phagocytic cell by invagination of a portion of the cell membrane as a vacuole.
[L. in-gero, to carry in]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

in·ges·tion

(in-jes'chŭn)
1. Introduction of food and drink into the stomach.
2. Incorporation of particles into the cytoplasm of a phagocytic cell by invagination of a portion of the cell membrane as a vacuole.
[L. in-gero, to carry in]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ingestion

The process of taking food or other material into the stomach. Ingestion is followed by DIGESTION, ABSORPTION and, finally, ASSIMILATION.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ingestion

the act of taking food into the gut system, where it is then subjected to DIGESTION.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This increase is of concern because battery ingestions increased 150-fold over the study period.
A's significantly elevated insulin was consistent with normal glipizide effects in a healthy child, while the elevated C-peptide was consistent with insulin being endogenously produced, which ruled out ingestion of her parent's insulin.
Since 1983, the United States Food and Drug Administration has restricted the concentration of camphor allowed in over-the-counter therapeutic products to < 11%, however ingestion by small children of as little as 5 mL of products at this concentration can induce serious toxicity.
Our study is the first of its type in Oman to describe the frequency of FB ingestion in children, the types of FBs ingested, the burden of endoscopic intervention, and the frequency of complications as seen in Royal Hospital, Oman.
Ingestion of foreign body is a common problem encountered in pediatric gastro-enterology1.
Patients with FB ingestions present either as asymptomatic or with a variety of symptoms.
Twenty-one patients, including 14 (67%) boys and 7 (33%) girls, were admitted for WAB ingestion from September 2008 to February2017.
Usually, the ingestion of a single small magnetic foreign body does not cause damage to the gastrointestinal tract [3].
Mackay, "Case of unrecognised food bone ingestion with dual site intestinal perforations," BMJ Case Reports, 2015.
In low- and middle-income countries, including South Africa (SA), ingestion of paraffin remains a common cause of childhood poisoning.
Amanita phalloides, colloquially known as the "death cap," belongs to the Phalloideae section of the Amanita family of mushrooms and is responsible for most deaths following ingestion of foraged mushrooms worldwide (1).