infuse

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infuse

(ĭn-fyo͞oz′)
tr.v. in·fused, in·fusing, in·fuses
1. To steep or soak without boiling in order to extract soluble elements or active principles.
2. To introduce (a solution) into the body through a vein for therapeutic purposes.

in·fus′er n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Norpro has introduced several new and unusual accessories: a silver-plated honey spoon that sits on the edge of the teacup and drips honey into tea, a gold-plated and stainless steel teapot in the shape of a creamer; lemon squeezers; cloth brew bags; and heartshaped shaped steel mesh tea infusers.
The infuser is capable of creating nourishing, spa-quality water or can be used to infuse spirits, wine and cold teas.
The new Flavor Infusers and Energy Drops work in conjunction with any of our Medifast programs or as a flavorful addition to enhance daily water consumption.
Similar marketing efforts are focusing the opportunities for the beeLINE and OutBound infusers in oncology and pain management.
It is designed to prevent air embolism which can be a serious complication in the use of pressure infusers.
The agreement will cover the following product types: Single Patient Use/Disposable Pressure Infusers.
The Citrus Zinger Biggie is the latest new product from Zing Anything, which offers a full line of eco-friendly infusers, including the Aqua Zinger, Vodka Zinger, Salad Zinger and Kid Zinger.
025 mm) and has dozens of types of tea balls ranging up to a goodly 3 inches in diameter (the common two-inch is too small for most professional use) and other infusers.
Today, McKinley-designed infusers are considered world leaders in emerging pain-management regimens that include surgical and orthopedic applications.
MixTracker is the only software currently available that enables infusers to precisely control, monitor and log the ingredients they use to manufacture marijuana-infused products, such as edibles and extracts.
In the past, these have included pots with infusers that lift out, pots with two compartments and a filter between the two, and the Simple Yet Perfect pot (designed by the Earl of Dundonald in 1905) that stood on its back to brew and then, when the tea was ready, tipped forward on to its legs to make sure the leaves were no longer in contact with the boiling water.