infusate

infusate

[infyo̅o̅′sāt]
a parenteral fluid slowly introduced into a patient over a specific period.

in·fu·sate

(in-fyūzāt)
A fluid given intravenously over a period of time for therapeutic purposes.

infusate

(ĭn-fū′zāt) [L. infusus, poured into]
Any liquid introduced into the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
The limitation in using these data is that the infusate used was different in composition than an infusion of only HTS.
Hayek and Goomber [1] proposed various routes of infection spread such as direct spread from skin flora with migration along the catheter, contamination of the infusate, and hematogenous spread from a distant source, with prime suspicion given to that of direct spread from skin flora with migration along the epidural catheter.
2) The effects of venous tubing insulation and infusion flow rate on the infusate temperature rise from the level of the fluid bag to the level of the intravenous cannula at ambient conditions.
Mycobacterium abscessus bacteremia after receipt of intravenous infusate of cytokine-induced killer cell therapy for body beautification and health boosting.
125% bupivacaine and subsequent addition of fentanyl to the infusate via a catheter inserted via supraclavicular approach into the sheath of brachial plexus.
They stated that DEHP release is associated with the length of infusion line, pH of the infusate, flow rate, duration and lipophility of infusion.
Bines and Hart (1984) reporting plasma hormones and metabolite responses to intraruminal infusion of VFA mixtures in cattle found that insulin concentrations were less when propionate was omitted from the infusate.
Roussel and colleagues conducted a small uncontrolled trial in 6 adults where EDTA chelation therapy was administered according to standard protocol except for elimination of the vitamin C from the infusate.
High blood flows and dialysate and/ or infusate flows which will increase solute removal.
Griffith L, Billman G, Daily P, Lane T 1989 Apparent coagulopathy caused by infusion of shed mediastinal blood and its prevention by washing of the infusate The Annals of Thoracic Surgery 47 400-406
Numerous countries have reported CLABSI outbreaks resulting from contaminated infusate in open infusion systems [2,6-10].
However, Mace et al (14) in acute intestinal perfusion experiments found no change in mannitol transport, when they incorporated calcium in the infusate.