infrasound


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infrasound

(ĭn′fră-sownd″)
Sounds of low frequency used, e.g., in diagnostic and therapeutic technologies.
References in periodicals archive ?
Case 5 was undertaken to document the sound, infrasound, and ductwork vibration parameters by changing fan speeds, duct pressures, and flow aerodynamics of a known HVAC system with duct rumble.
At the most general level, the paracoustic phenomena examined in the book might arise from one or more of three broad categories of influences--mundane physical and psychological processes (such as the effects of infrasound on subjective experience or the effects of pareidolia on interpretations of EVP), parapsychological processes (ESP and PK), or disembodied consciousness.
The new upwind turbines minimize LFS and infrasound (Musial, Ram, & National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 2010; Szasz & Fuchs, 2010).
Two concerts were played, identical in every way, except for the fact that the scientists secretly generated infrasound using a large pipe and played it underneath the music during one of the concerts.
Infrasound emission from wind turbines, Journal of Low Frequency Noise, Vibration and Active Control 24(3): 145-155.
Wind generator infrasound is an emerging health concern not yet regulated by the state, according to officials.
Earth (seismic), or atmosphere (infrasound); a fourth detects
However the British Wind Energy Association (BWEA) website says in its Frequently Asked Questions: "Wind turbines are not noisy." To compound this view, also on the BWEA website, Dr Leventhall wrote: "I can state quite categorically that there is no significant infrasound from current designs of wind turbines."
These frequencies are from previous physiological surveys already established and move especially on the field of infrasound and then in audible range of frequencies around 300 and 2000Hz.
In addition, the organization is building 60 infrasound stations that detect minute changes in atmospheric pressure caused by a nuclear test.
Provey also allows Christine Real de Azua of AWEA to dismiss the issue of "wind turbine syndrome." Vibroacoustic disease is a well-documented occupational hazard caused by exposure to high levels of infrasound and low-frequency sound.