informal care


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

informal care

Care that is provided to the very young, the very old, the weak, the poor, and the sick by family, friends, neighbors, and concerned citizens, rather than by trained, licensed, or certified health care professionals.
See also: care
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
To determine whether an individual is to be granted public care, objective "indications" are set: The amount of help one receives depends on how much informal care family and "significant others" can provide (WRR 1997, 165).
These studies provide mixed evidence of labor supply or informal care adjustments in response to competing demands.
It is still possible, however, that cognitively impaired subjects who had no family available to provide any informal care were more likely to have been institutionalized than physically impaired people in a similar social situation; so that, for those living in the community, more cognitively impaired than physically impaired people would have an informal carer.
Also, caregiving cost incurred by productivity loss and informal care time were not taken into account because caregivers were mostly patients' relatives.
Results: The aging of the population, the increasing gap between availability of informal care and demand for LTC, substantial market failures of private funding for LTC, and fiscal imbalances in some countries, have led to structural reforms and enduring pressures for LTC policy-makers across the EU.
The collaboration and communication between formal and informal care providers, along with the care receiver, need to be detailed and continuous, with mutual respect for the contribution of everyone on the team, including the wishes of the care receiver.
If we as a society really believe that earning a living is a trivial thing for family caregivers, then we need to put our money where our shaming is and create a special pension program for caregivers, to ensure that they can support a decent standard of living while giving up paid work in order to provide informal care.
Informal care is the most important form of care of disabled persons throughout the world.
Taking into account that informal care is usually unpaid, the caregiver must directly derive utility from the activity in order to be willing to provide care to his or her parents.
After the death of his wife Nicola, Jamie Rogers wanted to find a solution which would help the informal care network such as family and friends deal with the day-to-day complications of caring for a loved one.
Arno, Levine, and Memmott (1999) drew attention to the sheer size of this informal care "sector," estimating that 22-26 billion hours of informal care time were provided in 1997.
The UN agreements affirm that "care giving in the home" must be reconceptualized as socially necessary work that contributes to the economy and argue that efforts to produce new knowledge and policy solutions about informal care as well as the provision of informal care itself must be financially supported by governments (United Nations 1995: Section 209:f,g).

Full browser ?