inflection

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Related to inflective: inflexed

inflection

 [in´flek-shun]
the act of bending inward, or the state of being bent inward.

in·flec·tion

, inflexion (in-flek'shŭn),
1. An inward bending.
2. Obsolete term for diffraction.
[L. in-flecto, pp. -flexus, to bend]

in·flec·tion

, inflexion (in-flek'shŭn)
An inward bending.
[L. in-flecto, pp. -flexus, to bend]
References in periodicals archive ?
As late as 1824 the clergyman and geologist Joseph Townsend (1739-1816) published a book, asserting 'a striking resemblance between the Welsh and the Hebrew'.(19) Prichard's theory was not original, but the method he chose to corroborate it was novel indeed: he was the first Briton to demonstrate the link between the 'original' language and its supposed living scion by means of comparative linguistics - a theory devised by scholars who prided themselves of not being bogged down in their enquiries by religious considerations.(20) Friedrich Schlegel's definition of the most advanced 'inflective' languages had excluded the Hebrew (he claimed that the verbal roots of inflective languages consist of one syllable only; the Hebrew, by contrast, in his view was disyllabic).
In contrast, for example, to the Indo-European languages, which are inflective, Sumerian is agglutinative (i.e., the root word does not change but is modified by adding suffixes).
And it is evident in the inflective music of her utterances.
Its Latin aspect, which made its way into English via Norman French, is inflective. It expresses different relationships by changing word forms.
On the other hand, when persons injured in the right anterior hemisphere lose the ability to express the tonal, inflective, or nonverbal aspects of emotion, they sound flat and uninterested.
The sum of these activities, together with her own studio work, constitutes a mutually inflective practice in which Grabner's paintings, drawings, and prints mine the interstices of both material and social fabrics.
To conclude the classification of affixes, it needs to be noted that the nominal suffixes -a, -e, -o, -u, which can be considered derivational (Gonzalez Torres 2010; fc.), are treated as exclusively inflective and, consequently, left out of the inventory of suffixes selected for the analysis.
Most of the art songs recorded here sound thoroughly Victorian, with thick textures, rich harmonies, and heavily inflective melodies.
For example, faer, which is a bare stem, represents an instance of zero-derivation proper whereas bryce, with a final -e morpheme, is a case of overlapping of inflection and derivation, given that the morpheme performs an inflective and a derivational function simultaneously.