inflection

(redirected from inflectional)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to inflectional: inflectional morphology

inflection

 [in´flek-shun]
the act of bending inward, or the state of being bent inward.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·flec·tion

, inflexion (in-flek'shŭn),
1. An inward bending.
2. Obsolete term for diffraction.
[L. in-flecto, pp. -flexus, to bend]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

in·flec·tion

, inflexion (in-flek'shŭn)
An inward bending.
[L. in-flecto, pp. -flexus, to bend]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
These authors selected a small number of derivative and inflectional suffixes from Dutch (4 in total), which included productive and unproductive morphemes, thus obtaining a set of words to carry out a lexical decision task.
Similarly, the processes of zero-derivation and inflection have been distinguished, with round brackets denoting the former process and curly brackets indicating inflectional derivation.
There are 92 occurrences of the various inflectional forms of noun diin in the text of the Qur'an.
Teachers in each group miscounted morphemes in words with the inflectional ending -ed.
Inflectional morphology reinforces cohesion within and between phrases, clauses, and sentences.
While affixation and compounding are used as in standard terminology, it must be borne in mind that zero derivation is used with the meaning of affixless derivation or derivation without inflectional affixes and that conversion represents a special case of zero derivation in which the target category is morphologically invariable.
Czech exploits what can be called a "cumulation" of functions, that is, one inflectional suffix conveys as a rule several grammatical categories; for nouns, adjectives and pronouns (as well as numerals) the categories expressed by the affixes are gender, number and case.
derivational and inflectional morphology, syntax, etc.).