inflation

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inflation

 [in-fla´shun]
distention or the act of distending, with air, gas, or fluid.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·fla·tion

(in-flā'shŭn),
Distention by a fluid or gas.
[L. inflatio, fr. in-flo, pp. -flatus, to blow into, inflate]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

inflation

In the context of fat fetishism, the deliberate distension of the stomach with air or liquids to evoke arousal in a fat-admiring sexual partner.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·fla·tion

(in-flā'shŭn)
Distention by a fluid or gas.
Synonym(s): vesiculation (2) .
[L. inflatio, fr. in-flo, pp. -flatus, to blow into, inflate]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

in·fla·tion

(in-flā'shŭn)
Distention by a fluid or gas.
Synonym(s): vesiculation (2) .
[L. inflatio, fr. in-flo, pp. -flatus, to blow into, inflate]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In general, all inflation targets, as currently administered, have a few common elements such as the requirement to achieve a desired inflation rate in terms of a cost of living index, usually the consumer price index (CPI).
After adopting transitional measures intended to lower inflation expectations gradually, four of the eight central banks define a term over which the inflation target is to be met.
There is strong evidence that high inflation imposes significant real costs by reducing the efficiency with which the pricing system allocates resources and by generating uncertainty.
Leaving aside the issue of measurement biases the debate as to whether a higher than zero inflation rate is optimal has centred around the following.[2]
Thus the absence of credibility produces the inflation inertia that is missing in the pure Keynesian case.
So far I have asked why it is costly to reduce inflation. But how does high inflation arise in the first place?
First, core and median CPI inflation are currently running above headline CPI inflation; in 2010, the ordering was reversed.
Higher food and oil price rise in 2008 (than recent historic levels) resulted in above (historical) average food inflation in Pakistan in subsequent months.
In this article, I evaluate how well a structural NKPC can account for the changing nature of inflation in the United States from the 1950s to today.
These theories suggest that inflation may damage financial markets or impede their smooth operation.
Fischer argues that the world has seen four great waves of inflation and stability since 1200.
There is absolutely no question that bringing the underlying inflation rate down from its current level of about 4.5 percent to about 1 or 1.5 percent will involve costs in terms of at least some shortfall of actual output relative to potential output over the transition period.