inflation

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inflation

 [in-fla´shun]
distention or the act of distending, with air, gas, or fluid.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·fla·tion

(in-flā'shŭn),
Distention by a fluid or gas.
[L. inflatio, fr. in-flo, pp. -flatus, to blow into, inflate]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

inflation

In the context of fat fetishism, the deliberate distension of the stomach with air or liquids to evoke arousal in a fat-admiring sexual partner.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·fla·tion

(in-flā'shŭn)
Distention by a fluid or gas.
Synonym(s): vesiculation (2) .
[L. inflatio, fr. in-flo, pp. -flatus, to blow into, inflate]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

in·fla·tion

(in-flā'shŭn)
Distention by a fluid or gas.
Synonym(s): vesiculation (2) .
[L. inflatio, fr. in-flo, pp. -flatus, to blow into, inflate]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
His comment about "extreme inflationists" is even more revealing and deserves further scrutiny.
In addition to greenbackism, there are at least two other ways of visualizing an expansionary monetary policy, reductions in the price of money (currency depreciation), and reductions in the rental cost of money (lower interest rates.) It is possible that the preceding comment on the "extreme inflationists" was a reference to the dollar depreciation program of late 1933.
In the December 1933 Times article Keynes argued that monetary policy cannot restore full employment, whereas less than three weeks later he is expressing relief that Roosevelt avoided the policy recommendations of the "extreme inflationists." One explanation for the preceding conundrum is that when applying the policy ineffectiveness proposition to output, Keynes was only considering a set of monetary policies that would be "reasonable," that is, unlikely to lead to a "flight from the currency" (or a positive expected rate of inflation).
Evidently, passage of the act did contribute to quieting fears that the inflationists would prevail.
As late as 1877, however, inflationists controlled both houses of Congress, and they made a determined effort to repeal the Resumption Act.
I have been arguing that inflationists as well as deflationists need some use-independent notion of truth as a device of infinite conjunction and disjunction, and that such a notion is needed only for sentences that one understands.
Deflationists about meaning-that and believing-that think that such disquotational notions of expressing are the only legitimate ones; inflationists disagree.
Governments, at any time, tend to be inflationist in policy because it makes finance so much easier for them.