infirmity

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in·fir·mi·ty

(in-fĭr'mi-tē),
A weakness; an abnormal, more or less disabling, condition of mind or body.
[see infirm]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

infirmity

(ĭn-fûr′mĭ-tē)
n. pl. infirmi·ties
a. The condition of being infirm, often as associated with old age; weakness or frailty: the infirmity brought on by the disease.
b. A bodily ailment or weakness: complained about his infirmities.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

in·firm·i·ty

(in-fĭr'mi-tē)
A weakness; an abnormal, more or less disabling, condition of mind or body.
See also: infirm
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

in·firm·i·ty

(in-fĭr'mi-tē)
A weakness; an abnormal condition of mind or body.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
'In the light of the above obvious and glaring defects and infirmities in the Judgment we have formed a prima facie, tentative opinion that the convictions and sentences handed down to the Petitioners may not be ultimately sustainable,' IHC ruled.
VIEW the infirmities column at www.1911census.co.uk and at www.findmypast.co.uk.
mental infirmities and 302 cases of severe mental infirmities, while the more
Its event's aim is to draw attention to individuals with infirmities and help with their greater social integration.
He took up our infirmities and carried our sorrows .
The inevitable infirmities of aging and death are difficult for most people to consider and only then in moments of crisis.
Had this happened earlier, T.M.'s options would have been to stay at a homeless shelter, have her name put on a long waiting list for other public housing, or try to get into a traditional domestic violence shelter, if suitable space was available and if she would be accepted with her many medical infirmities. Most likely, she would have returned to the violence and remained isolated and afraid.
Despite the litany of infirmities, the National Popular Vote Plan has been introduced in a number of states including California.
He tells of Jesus journeying from one town and village to another, accompanied by the Twelve and many women, some of whom had been cured of evil spirits and infirmities: "Mary, called Magdalene, from whom seven demons had gone out, and Joanna, the wife of Herod's steward Chuza, and Susanna, and many others who provided for them out of their resources" (Luke 8:2-3).
Rather than hide his infirmities, as most public figures do, he let the whole world see what he went through.
The corporate AMT suffers from the same infirmities as the individual AMT.
While the writer is entirely correct in stating that the judiciary should be on guard for constitutional infirmities, nowhere in the referenced article did the governor state or imply otherwise.