infirm


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infirm

 [in-ferm´]
weak; feeble, as from disease or old age.

in·firm

(in-fĭrm'),
Weak or feeble because of old age or disease.
[L. in-firmus, fr. in- neg. + firmus, strong]

infirm

/in·firm/ (in-firm´) weak; feeble, as from disease or old age.

infirm

(ĭn-fûrm′)
adj.
Weak in body or mind, especially from old age or disease.

in·firm′ly adv.

in·firm

(in-fĭrm')
Weak or feeble because of old age or disease.

in·firm

(in-fĭrm')
Weak or feeble because of old age or disease.

infirm

weak; feeble, as from disease or old age.
References in periodicals archive ?
The usual answer to disabled, infirm people requiring help in their homes or needing such aids as stairlifts, walk-in showers etc is: 'The council doesn't have enough money.
Our uncut hedges have made it so simple for anyone with evil intent to identify the most vulnerable people's homes - obviously, the more neglected the hedges, the more infirm the occupants.
They lose contact with their friends and as their numbers decrease so the service will be withdrawn altogether and we will abandon our old and infirm to the scrap heap.
A van that helps transport the elderly, infirm and disabled has been given a lick of paint.
Despite being convicted by a jury of ill-treating seven mentally infirm patients, the 27-year-old insists she did nothing wrong.
Irving was found guilty at Cardiff Crown Court of illtreating seven elderly mentally infirm patients and neglecting an eighth at Blackmill Nursing Home, Bridgend, in the late 1990s, when she was care manager.