infinitude


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Related to infinitude: infinitely

infinitude

(ĭn-fĭn′ĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
1. The state or quality of being infinite.
2. An immeasurably large quantity, number, or extent.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
number, between an infinitude and a negation of movement, between an
Insofar as the active infinitude of material reality and the nature of perception are concerned, the metaphysics of Leibniz aligns with the main points of Blake's "b" series of No Natural Religion more closely than does the philosophy of Berkeley.
Kook, they demolish "that which is built according to the measure of the world," because they are seeking out the divine infinitude. (45) In this depiction of the rebels among secular Zionists, R.
In doing so, she illuminates "the relationship between the emergence of a new form of observer, one both radically individuated and simultaneously networked, and a novel form of knowledge production based on assumptions of informational infinitude, a 'communicative objectivity'" (p.
Call me vibrational matter shimmering in infinitude. Remind me of my true nature.
Perhaps no trope of science fiction is as invested in coping with infinitude as the black hole, which I will read as moments where science fiction sequesters its own attempts at explanation and conjecture, naming an unknown thing or process or phenomenon as fundamentally inexplicable, as literally beyond the known.
We learn that Mort(e)'s heightened consciousness is a gift from the leader of the animal revolution: an ancient Queen ant and her colony who emerge from the underground, a swarm-pack-war-machine of seeming infinitude both in number and devotion to their matriarch and her vengeful cause.
Kierkegaard (1849/1980) voiced a similar dialectic in describing the self as a relational synthesis "composed of infinitude and finitude" (p.
Diaz concludes his detailed analysis, asserting that Borges is a better Whitman who employs the rhetorical device of litotes to indicate a cosmos underlying the apparent chaos of the Aleph and to conjure up the impression of the entire world: "The more partial, minute, and insignificant things Borges enumerates (veins of metal, a tumor, the delicate bones of a hand, the shadows of a fern), the more vividly the impression of infinitude, endlessness, and totality is conveyed [...]" (158).