infest

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in·fest

(in-fest'),
To occupy a site and dwell ectoparasitically on external surface tissue, as opposed to internally (infect).
[L. infesto, pp. -atus, to attack]

infest

(ĭn-fĕst′)
v.
To live as a parasite in or on tissues or organs or on the skin and its appendages.

in′fes·ta′tion n.

in·fest

(in-fest')
To dwell on or in a host as a parasite.
[L. infesto, pp. -atus, to attack]
References in periodicals archive ?
The prolonged contact with the infested animal can result in high risk of getting permanent infestation (Walton et al., 1999).
Induction of infection to domestic rabbits Naturally and heavily infested adult German Shepherd (Canis lupus familiaris) dogs were used as source of mites for the studies.
A clear change in the behavior of the infested animals was also observed.
In this analysis, each point (tree) was assigned a value of 1 if the tree was infested with mistletoe, and 0 if the tree was not infested with mistletoe.
This indicates that there was a tendency for highly infested trees to be near other highly infested trees, while minimally infested trees tended to be near other minimally infested trees.
This relatively low density may have an effect on both the prevalence and distribution of mistletoe infested trees.
Root damage was evaluated for infested Swingle citrumelo plants using a visual rating system where 0 = no visible damage, 1 = minimal visible damage, 2 = moderate visible damage, and 3 = maximum visible damage.
For each plant species, there were 2 larval infestation treatments (infested or not infested) and 2 flooding treatments (flooded or non-flooded) arranged in a 2 x 2 factorial design with 5 single-plant replications per treatment combination.
Mean intensity also was not significantly different between the northern and the southern rock sole for Nectobrachia indivisa (Welch's approximate t-test, [Alpha]=0.05, df=2, P [is greater than] 0.05); however only two southern rock soles were infested with N.
Northern rock soles infested by one species of parasite had an increased likelihood of also being infested by the other species of parasite (chi square test, [Alpha]=0.05, P [is less than] 0.001), similar to our observations for northern rock soles from the Gulf of Alaska.
Biomass accumulation of Cuscuta species also varied significantly (P [less than or equal to] 0.001) among the infested host plant species (Fig.
Condition (survival) of woody and subwoody hosts infested with Cuscuta species was observed.