inference

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in·fer·ence

(in'fĕr-ens),
The logical process of passing from observations and axioms to generalizations; in statistics, the development of generalizations from sample data, usually with calculated degrees of uncertainty.

inference

(in′f(ĕ-)rĕns)
A conclusion drawn by a logical analysis of the available evidence.
References in periodicals archive ?
With regard to the Pakistani ESL students' abilities in reading comprehension, they are lagging behind in coping with inferential and reorganization comprehension (Javed, Eng, and Mohamed, 2013).
Significant differences among the groups were also found when the literal questions were added, and also when added inferential questions, it was observed that the total average of the sum of the questions was higher for inferential questions, suggesting lower performance for this type of question.
321) defines statistical power in a Bayesian context as "[t]he probability of achieving the goal [of the study], given the (suspected) true state of the world." He describes the value of using simulated data to evaluate power when planning research, but he does not address all types of inferential errors.
In other words, the assumptions of inferential statistics are absolutely required for predictive estimation.
If, as Brandom suggests, the proposition making explicit the agent's inferential commitment, that is, the proposition "Generally, who has the status S should do A", is added, then the critical questions matching the argument (taking this proposition as a premise), that can be called (A) Argument from Social Status:
Whereas an exhaustive account of the process would likely require a textbook, we will attempt to illustrate the process by describing the program design and development specific to ensuring that learners' verbal repertoires meet the program's vocabulary requirements (from context and directly taught), as well as the design specific to teaching inferential comprehension.
Aside from these misconceptions, it was also found out that many graduate students do not use inferential methods appropriately.
Indirect evidentials are split in two subcategories of inferential and quotative (also known as reportatives, reportive, reported, hearsay or second-hand) evidentials (cf.
They emphasize conducting small-scale research with, instead of on, participants in clinical practice, and the skills, values, and interests of therapists that are transferable to the research field, such as interviewing, reflexive interpretation, inferential thinking, and concepts of growth and understanding.
"But now, prima facie, the inferential role of 'brown cow' depends not only on the inferential role of 'brown' and the inferential role of 'cow', but also what you happen to believe about brown cows.
All said, Lee differentiates many layers of abstraction: an event-process level, an objective level, a descriptive level, and finally, an inferential level (cf.