infarct

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infarct

 [in´fahrkt]
a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by anoxia following occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the tissue, organ, or part.
anemic infarct one due to sudden interruption of arterial circulation to the area.
hemorrhagic infarct one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.

in·farct

(in'farkt),
An area of necrosis resulting from a sudden insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply.
Synonym(s): infarction (2)
[L. in-farcio, pp. -fartus (-ctus, an incorrect form), to stuff into]

infarct

/in·farct/ (in´fahrkt) a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the part.
anemic infarct  one due to the sudden arrest of circulation in a vessel, or to decoloration of hemorrhagic blood.
hemorrhagic infarct  one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.

infarct

(ĭn′färkt′, ĭn-färkt′)
n.
An area of tissue that undergoes necrosis as a result of obstruction of local blood supply, as by a thrombus or embolus.

in·farct′ed adj.

infarct

[infärkt′]
Etymology: L, infarcire, to stuff
a localized area of necrosis in a tissue resulting from anoxia. It is caused by an interruption in the blood supply to the area or, less frequently, by circulatory stasis produced by the occlusion of a vein that ordinarily carries blood away from the area. Some infarcts are pale and white because of the lack of circulation. Others may resemble a red, swollen bruise because of hemorrhage and an accumulation of blood in the area. Also called infarction.
enlarge picture
Infarct

infarct

Pathology Dead/necrotic tissue. See Acute myocardial infarct, Anemic infarct, Lacunar infarct, Myocardial infarct, Non-Q-wave infarct, Pseudoinfarct, Q wave infarct, Red infarct, Reperfusion-eligible acute myocardial infarct, Watershed infarct, White infarct. Cf Infarction.

in·farct

(in'fahrkt)
An area of necrosis resulting from a sudden insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply.
Synonym(s): infarction (2) .

infarct

A volume of dead tissue lying within living tissue, the death being caused by local loss of blood supply. Infarcted tissue swells and becomes firm, and blood vessels around an infarct widen. Plasma and blood may pass into the infarct, increasing the swelling. Later the infarct becomes pale and shrinks and soon it is replaced by fibrous tissue and is converted into a scar which is usually at least as strong as the original tissue. Function is, of course, lost.

Infarct

Death of tissue due to shutting off the blood supply.
Mentioned in: Tetralogy of Fallot

infarct

area of tissue necrosis caused by infarction

infarct (in·färktˑ),

n localized tissue death resulting from an interruption of blood supply to that area. Also called
infarction.
Enlarge picture
Infarct.

in·farc·tion

(in-fahrk'shŭn)
Area of tissue necrosis caused by impaired arterial or venous blood supply due to mechanical factors (e.g., emboli, thrombi) or to blood pressure alterations.
Synonym(s): infarct.

infarct (in´färkt),

n the death of a tissue caused by partial occlusion of a vessel or vessels supplying the area.

infarct

a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the part. Clinical signs depend on the size of the devitalized tissue and the organ affected.

anemic infarct
one due to sudden interruption of flow of arterial blood to the area.
hemorrhagic infarct
one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.
References in periodicals archive ?
Acute bilateral paramedian thalamic infarcts after occlusion of the artery of Percheron.
This case reminds us that a small infarct area of central nervous system may mimic peripheral nerve lesions, especially in elderly patients.
The participants were stratified as having no infarcts (1,611), only ILLs (50), large infarcts (185), or both lesions (35).
The arterial inner diameters, AVR[sub]in and AVR[sub]out showed a significant negative correlation with the number of small infarcts.
Dawn E Saunders and others on measurement of infarct size using MRI in prediction of prognosis of MCA infarct, mean age of patients with cortical MCA territory infarct was 66.
The onset of neurological deficits from stroke is often several minutes after blockage or hemorrhage; however, deficits can continue to develop for up to several days after infarct (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 2014).
2) Venous infarcts occur due to obstruction of the venous system by thrombus or external compression.
We encountered the rare case of an elderly patient who showed marked deterioration of the cognitive function and prolonged cognitive impairment after her first lacunar infarct at the right internal capsule.
Keywords: Low hemoglobin concentration, Placental infarcts, Placental morphology, Placental weight, Syncytial knots.
Imaging and laboratory examinations play an essential role in diagnosis of CADASIL: the key diagnostic features include (1) Leukoaraiosis and multiple small infarcts presented bilaterally in deep white matter, basal ganglia, thalamus, and pons on MRI; (2) granular and osmiophilic substance layers around the vascular smooth muscles in the brain, skeletal muscle, peripheral nerves, and skin verified by electron microscopy; and (3) NOTCH3 mutations confirmed by DNA analysis [22].
measured S100B levels of 39 patients with MCA infarcts who reached the hospital within the first 6 hours at the 48th and 72nd hours and found a relationship with the functional outcome at 6 months and also with infarct volume.
The study found that those who had high long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid content in blood had about 40 percent lower risk of having small brain infarcts compared to those with low content of these fatty acids in blood.