infarct

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infarct

 [in´fahrkt]
a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by anoxia following occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the tissue, organ, or part.
anemic infarct one due to sudden interruption of arterial circulation to the area.
hemorrhagic infarct one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.

in·farct

(in'farkt),
An area of necrosis resulting from a sudden insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply.
Synonym(s): infarction (2)
[L. in-farcio, pp. -fartus (-ctus, an incorrect form), to stuff into]

infarct

/in·farct/ (in´fahrkt) a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the part.
anemic infarct  one due to the sudden arrest of circulation in a vessel, or to decoloration of hemorrhagic blood.
hemorrhagic infarct  one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.

infarct

(ĭn′färkt′, ĭn-färkt′)
n.
An area of tissue that undergoes necrosis as a result of obstruction of local blood supply, as by a thrombus or embolus.

in·farct′ed adj.

infarct

[infärkt′]
Etymology: L, infarcire, to stuff
a localized area of necrosis in a tissue resulting from anoxia. It is caused by an interruption in the blood supply to the area or, less frequently, by circulatory stasis produced by the occlusion of a vein that ordinarily carries blood away from the area. Some infarcts are pale and white because of the lack of circulation. Others may resemble a red, swollen bruise because of hemorrhage and an accumulation of blood in the area. Also called infarction.
enlarge picture
Infarct

infarct

Pathology Dead/necrotic tissue. See Acute myocardial infarct, Anemic infarct, Lacunar infarct, Myocardial infarct, Non-Q-wave infarct, Pseudoinfarct, Q wave infarct, Red infarct, Reperfusion-eligible acute myocardial infarct, Watershed infarct, White infarct. Cf Infarction.

in·farct

(in'fahrkt)
An area of necrosis resulting from a sudden insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply.
Synonym(s): infarction (2) .

infarct

A volume of dead tissue lying within living tissue, the death being caused by local loss of blood supply. Infarcted tissue swells and becomes firm, and blood vessels around an infarct widen. Plasma and blood may pass into the infarct, increasing the swelling. Later the infarct becomes pale and shrinks and soon it is replaced by fibrous tissue and is converted into a scar which is usually at least as strong as the original tissue. Function is, of course, lost.

Infarct

Death of tissue due to shutting off the blood supply.
Mentioned in: Tetralogy of Fallot

infarct

area of tissue necrosis caused by infarction

infarct (in·färktˑ),

n localized tissue death resulting from an interruption of blood supply to that area. Also called
infarction.
Enlarge picture
Infarct.

in·farc·tion

(in-fahrk'shŭn)
Area of tissue necrosis caused by impaired arterial or venous blood supply due to mechanical factors (e.g., emboli, thrombi) or to blood pressure alterations.
Synonym(s): infarct.

infarct (in´färkt),

n the death of a tissue caused by partial occlusion of a vessel or vessels supplying the area.

infarct

a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the part. Clinical signs depend on the size of the devitalized tissue and the organ affected.

anemic infarct
one due to sudden interruption of flow of arterial blood to the area.
hemorrhagic infarct
one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.
References in periodicals archive ?
5, a range commonly observed across metropolitan regions in New England and New York, was associated with being more likely to have covert brain infarcts and smaller cerebral brain volume, equivalent to approximately one year of brain aging.
measured S100B levels of 39 patients with MCA infarcts who reached the hospital within the first 6 hours at the 48th and 72nd hours and found a relationship with the functional outcome at 6 months and also with infarct volume.
The study found that those who had high long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid content in blood had about 40 percent lower risk of having small brain infarcts compared to those with low content of these fatty acids in blood.
1 a & b show enlarged spleen with a large non-enhancing hypoattenuating area involving the anterior aspect of spleen consistent with splenic infarct.
Large infarcts in the middle cerebral artery territory: etiology and outcome patterns.
This was true for both cortical and subcortical macroscopic infarcts (Stroke 2011 Sept.
The evaluation of infarct size after acute Ml is important for predicting the subsequent clinical course (1) and to validate the effectiveness and clinical relevance of therapeutic interventions.
The infarct location and volume were assessed by 2 independent observers as described previously (19-23).
Similarly, infarcts in the cerebellum, but not in cortical or subcortical locations, were more prevalent in women who reported migraine with aura in midlife (23%) than in women without headache (15%), but there was no difference in prevalence among men.
The increase in left ventricular mass is the result of hypertrophy of the cardiac myocytes in non-infarcted myocardium remote to the infarct zone.
The finding that Alzheimer's pathology with cerebral infarcts is a common combination in people with dementia adds to emerging evidence that it is feasible to reduce some of the risk of dementia by using the same tools used for cardiovascular disease, such as controlling of blood cholesterol levels and hypertension.
Certain clinical and autopsy findings in 21 patients with grossly visible calcific deposits at sites of healed myocardial infarcts have been previously reported by one of us (WCR) (4).