infarct

(redirected from infarcts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

infarct

 [in´fahrkt]
a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by anoxia following occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the tissue, organ, or part.
anemic infarct one due to sudden interruption of arterial circulation to the area.
hemorrhagic infarct one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·farct

(in'farkt),
An area of necrosis resulting from a sudden insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply.
Synonym(s): infarction (2)
[L. in-farcio, pp. -fartus (-ctus, an incorrect form), to stuff into]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

infarct

(ĭn′färkt′, ĭn-färkt′)
n.
An area of tissue that undergoes necrosis as a result of obstruction of local blood supply, as by a thrombus or embolus.

in·farct′ed adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

infarct

Pathology Dead/necrotic tissue. See Acute myocardial infarct, Anemic infarct, Lacunar infarct, Myocardial infarct, Non-Q-wave infarct, Pseudoinfarct, Q wave infarct, Red infarct, Reperfusion-eligible acute myocardial infarct, Watershed infarct, White infarct. Cf Infarction.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·farct

(in'fahrkt)
An area of necrosis resulting from a sudden insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply.
Synonym(s): infarction (2) .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

infarct

A volume of dead tissue lying within living tissue, the death being caused by local loss of blood supply. Infarcted tissue swells and becomes firm, and blood vessels around an infarct widen. Plasma and blood may pass into the infarct, increasing the swelling. Later the infarct becomes pale and shrinks and soon it is replaced by fibrous tissue and is converted into a scar which is usually at least as strong as the original tissue. Function is, of course, lost.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Infarct

Death of tissue due to shutting off the blood supply.
Mentioned in: Tetralogy of Fallot
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·farc·tion

(in-fahrk'shŭn)
Area of tissue necrosis caused by impaired arterial or venous blood supply due to mechanical factors (e.g., emboli, thrombi) or to blood pressure alterations.
Synonym(s): infarct.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Retinal arterial abnormalities correlate with brain white matter lesions in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy.
(iii) Multiple infarcts of different ages: MRI: ischemic lesions with hyperintense signals on DWI that meet 2 of the following 3 criteria: hypointense on ADC and isointense on FLAIR (hyperacute); hypointense on ADC and hyperintense on FLAIR (early acute); isointense on ADC and hyperintense on FLAIR (late acute or subacute); CT: simultaneous presence of acute, subacute, and/or old (liquorisodense) ischemic lesions
It showed a high-density fluid filled large defect in the superior aspect of the spleen consistent with splenic infarct (see Figure 1) and also a small pulmonary embolism in the right lower lobe.
Ulcerative atherosclerotic disease of the internal carotid artery can be implicated as a potential source of emboli that would reach the posterior circulation through a PTA, but cases of radiographically confirmed infarcts are rarely reported.
A third of stroke survivors will be diagnosed with depression according to various depression rating scales any time after their infarct (Hackett et al., 2005).
1) indicated only a single lacunar infarct at the posterior limb of the right internal capsule without brain atrophy.
The second type of lesions is lacunar infarcts in the semioval center, thalamus, basal ganglia, and pons, while the third type is represented with cerebral microbleeds (CMBs).
"For years, we've looked for a treatment that will reduce the size of the infarct beyond what we are able to accomplish with PCI and clot-busting drugs," says Cleveland Clinic cardiologist Steven Ellis, MD.
Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy: from stroke to vessel wall physiology.
AOP infarcts are unique in their bilateral, symmetric nature and can be mistaken for a systemic, rather than a vascular process.
[1] Among the ischemic strokes 50% involve the anterior circulation, 25 to the posterior circulation and the remaining 25% are lacunar infarcts. Occlusion of the MCA usually results from cardio embolism or proximal atherothrombosis.