infarct

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infarct

 [in´fahrkt]
a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by anoxia following occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the tissue, organ, or part.
anemic infarct one due to sudden interruption of arterial circulation to the area.
hemorrhagic infarct one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·farct

(in'farkt),
An area of necrosis resulting from a sudden insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply.
Synonym(s): infarction (2)
[L. in-farcio, pp. -fartus (-ctus, an incorrect form), to stuff into]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

infarct

(ĭn′färkt′, ĭn-färkt′)
n.
An area of tissue that undergoes necrosis as a result of obstruction of local blood supply, as by a thrombus or embolus.

in·farct′ed adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

infarct

Pathology Dead/necrotic tissue. See Acute myocardial infarct, Anemic infarct, Lacunar infarct, Myocardial infarct, Non-Q-wave infarct, Pseudoinfarct, Q wave infarct, Red infarct, Reperfusion-eligible acute myocardial infarct, Watershed infarct, White infarct. Cf Infarction.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·farct

(in'fahrkt)
An area of necrosis resulting from a sudden insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply.
Synonym(s): infarction (2) .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

infarct

A volume of dead tissue lying within living tissue, the death being caused by local loss of blood supply. Infarcted tissue swells and becomes firm, and blood vessels around an infarct widen. Plasma and blood may pass into the infarct, increasing the swelling. Later the infarct becomes pale and shrinks and soon it is replaced by fibrous tissue and is converted into a scar which is usually at least as strong as the original tissue. Function is, of course, lost.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Infarct

Death of tissue due to shutting off the blood supply.
Mentioned in: Tetralogy of Fallot
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·farc·tion

(in-fahrk'shŭn)
Area of tissue necrosis caused by impaired arterial or venous blood supply due to mechanical factors (e.g., emboli, thrombi) or to blood pressure alterations.
Synonym(s): infarct.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
These results are evidenced by significant increase in the serum levels of heart marker enzymes (ALT, AST, LDH, CK-MB and cTnI) in infarcted group when compared to control and treated groups.
Moreover, Woudstra and colleagues designed microbubbles coated with antibodies, targeting both the SC-specific marker CD90 and an adhesion molecule expressed on endothelial cells within the infarcted area.
This effect on [T.sub.1] shortening was sustained at 60 min and an optimal imaging time point of 20 min was adopted to allow for variation in administration dynamics and utilised in the infarcted myocardium MEMRI experiments.
After an acute MI, infarcted myocardium can be better characterized by distinguishing between the microvascular obstruction zone, the infarction core necrosis, the peripheral infarction zone, and the ischemic zone with delineation of the myocyte area at risk.
The velocity of this recovery, however, may depend on the extension and localization of the infarcted area, making comparison among studies difficult.
One week after myocardial infarction induction, hearts sections were stained with anti-CD68 antibody to identify infiltrated inflammatory cells in infarcted myocardium.
INFARCTED SPLEEN (6) 40% PSEUDOCYST SPLEEN (4) 27% SPLENIC ABSCESS (2) 13% EPITHELIAL CYST (1) 6% LYMPHANIOMA (1) 7% LITTORAL CELL ANGIOMA (1) 7% Note: Table made from pie chart.
The related experiments had proved that NBP had the pharmacological effects of reconstructing the microcirculation, reducing the infarcted lesions after focal cerebral ischemia, and reducing the degrees of neurological injuries, although the exact mechanism was still unclear.
For forelimb flexion, a normal rat will extend both forelimbs toward the surface when it is held by the tail above a flat surface whereas infarcted animals will flex the paralytic forelimb.
A small splenic infarction was seen, but the infarcted volume was less than 10% of total splenic volume (Figure 4(a)).
Myocardial viability and perfusion of the infarcted region and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), were measured using F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission computed tomography (F-18-FDG-PET) and 99mTc-sestamibi single- photon emission computed tomography (99mTc-SPECT), and two-dimensional echocardiography respectively.4 After a passage of eighteen months there was no significant difference in adverse effects seen between the two groups.