infarct

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infarct

 [in´fahrkt]
a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by anoxia following occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the tissue, organ, or part.
anemic infarct one due to sudden interruption of arterial circulation to the area.
hemorrhagic infarct one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.

in·farct

(in'farkt),
An area of necrosis resulting from a sudden insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply.
Synonym(s): infarction (2)
[L. in-farcio, pp. -fartus (-ctus, an incorrect form), to stuff into]

infarct

/in·farct/ (in´fahrkt) a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the part.
anemic infarct  one due to the sudden arrest of circulation in a vessel, or to decoloration of hemorrhagic blood.
hemorrhagic infarct  one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.

infarct

(ĭn′färkt′, ĭn-färkt′)
n.
An area of tissue that undergoes necrosis as a result of obstruction of local blood supply, as by a thrombus or embolus.

in·farct′ed adj.

infarct

[infärkt′]
Etymology: L, infarcire, to stuff
a localized area of necrosis in a tissue resulting from anoxia. It is caused by an interruption in the blood supply to the area or, less frequently, by circulatory stasis produced by the occlusion of a vein that ordinarily carries blood away from the area. Some infarcts are pale and white because of the lack of circulation. Others may resemble a red, swollen bruise because of hemorrhage and an accumulation of blood in the area. Also called infarction.
enlarge picture
Infarct

infarct

Pathology Dead/necrotic tissue. See Acute myocardial infarct, Anemic infarct, Lacunar infarct, Myocardial infarct, Non-Q-wave infarct, Pseudoinfarct, Q wave infarct, Red infarct, Reperfusion-eligible acute myocardial infarct, Watershed infarct, White infarct. Cf Infarction.

in·farct

(in'fahrkt)
An area of necrosis resulting from a sudden insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply.
Synonym(s): infarction (2) .

infarct

A volume of dead tissue lying within living tissue, the death being caused by local loss of blood supply. Infarcted tissue swells and becomes firm, and blood vessels around an infarct widen. Plasma and blood may pass into the infarct, increasing the swelling. Later the infarct becomes pale and shrinks and soon it is replaced by fibrous tissue and is converted into a scar which is usually at least as strong as the original tissue. Function is, of course, lost.

Infarct

Death of tissue due to shutting off the blood supply.
Mentioned in: Tetralogy of Fallot

infarct

area of tissue necrosis caused by infarction

infarct (in·färktˑ),

n localized tissue death resulting from an interruption of blood supply to that area. Also called
infarction.
Enlarge picture
Infarct.

in·farc·tion

(in-fahrk'shŭn)
Area of tissue necrosis caused by impaired arterial or venous blood supply due to mechanical factors (e.g., emboli, thrombi) or to blood pressure alterations.
Synonym(s): infarct.

infarct (in´färkt),

n the death of a tissue caused by partial occlusion of a vessel or vessels supplying the area.

infarct

a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the part. Clinical signs depend on the size of the devitalized tissue and the organ affected.

anemic infarct
one due to sudden interruption of flow of arterial blood to the area.
hemorrhagic infarct
one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ischemic and infarcted zones were identified under ultraviolet light ([lambda]=366 nm) and were measured with the Image Tool-software (University of Texas, USA).
We performed a cDNA expression screen by expressing pools of clones from an infarcted mouse heart cDNA expression library in COS1 cells and assaying for activation of a luciferase reporter controlled by a 642-bp fragment of the 5'-flanking region of mouse GDF15.
In this case, the fascicular pattern, spindle cell morphology, lack of marked cytologic atypia, and smooth muscle actin and desmin reactivities, with a lack of other lineage marker expression, all support a diagnosis of an infarcted leiomyoma.
There was a trend for infarcted rats to have higher heart rates than sham-treated ones, 420 [+ or -] 8 bpm vs 391 [+ or -] 18 bpm, respectively (P=0.
Professor Joshua Hare said: 'Ultimately, the goal is to develop a widely applicable treatment to repair and reverse the damage done to heart muscle that has been infarcted, or destroyed, after losing its blood supply.
By day 20, the labeled cells were present throughout the infarcted area but not in healthy tissue.
The genetically altered embryonic stem and progenitor cells may be maintained in-vitro as a stable cell line; and transplanted as active, mitotic cells to an infarcted area of the myocardial using any surgical procedure.
The best candidates for this novel therapy appear at this point to be patients with ischemic stroke involving stenosis of a large vessel and a resultant large area of hypoperfused but not infarcted tissue, Dr.
The medics soon realised that Alix's arm was infarcted, the medical term for gangrenous, and she was going to lose the limb.
This was a new phenomenon, never before described in medicine, so I researched it and found that the mental nerve, lying close to the medial aspect of the jaw became infarcted (deprived of blood) during her crisis.
muscles, including interstitial tearing, inflammation, and infarcted tissue;
But the dog trials that we've done suggest that you can salvage a third to two-thirds of that area of heart muscle that would have been infarcted [injured by lack of oxygen during a heart attack].