infarct

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infarct

 [in´fahrkt]
a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by anoxia following occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the tissue, organ, or part.
anemic infarct one due to sudden interruption of arterial circulation to the area.
hemorrhagic infarct one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.

in·farct

(in'farkt),
An area of necrosis resulting from a sudden insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply.
Synonym(s): infarction (2)
[L. in-farcio, pp. -fartus (-ctus, an incorrect form), to stuff into]

infarct

/in·farct/ (in´fahrkt) a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the part.
anemic infarct  one due to the sudden arrest of circulation in a vessel, or to decoloration of hemorrhagic blood.
hemorrhagic infarct  one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.

infarct

(ĭn′färkt′, ĭn-färkt′)
n.
An area of tissue that undergoes necrosis as a result of obstruction of local blood supply, as by a thrombus or embolus.

in·farct′ed adj.

infarct

[infärkt′]
Etymology: L, infarcire, to stuff
a localized area of necrosis in a tissue resulting from anoxia. It is caused by an interruption in the blood supply to the area or, less frequently, by circulatory stasis produced by the occlusion of a vein that ordinarily carries blood away from the area. Some infarcts are pale and white because of the lack of circulation. Others may resemble a red, swollen bruise because of hemorrhage and an accumulation of blood in the area. Also called infarction.
enlarge picture
Infarct

infarct

Pathology Dead/necrotic tissue. See Acute myocardial infarct, Anemic infarct, Lacunar infarct, Myocardial infarct, Non-Q-wave infarct, Pseudoinfarct, Q wave infarct, Red infarct, Reperfusion-eligible acute myocardial infarct, Watershed infarct, White infarct. Cf Infarction.

in·farct

(in'fahrkt)
An area of necrosis resulting from a sudden insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply.
Synonym(s): infarction (2) .

infarct

A volume of dead tissue lying within living tissue, the death being caused by local loss of blood supply. Infarcted tissue swells and becomes firm, and blood vessels around an infarct widen. Plasma and blood may pass into the infarct, increasing the swelling. Later the infarct becomes pale and shrinks and soon it is replaced by fibrous tissue and is converted into a scar which is usually at least as strong as the original tissue. Function is, of course, lost.

Infarct

Death of tissue due to shutting off the blood supply.
Mentioned in: Tetralogy of Fallot

infarct

area of tissue necrosis caused by infarction

infarct (in·färktˑ),

n localized tissue death resulting from an interruption of blood supply to that area. Also called
infarction.
Enlarge picture
Infarct.

in·farc·tion

(in-fahrk'shŭn)
Area of tissue necrosis caused by impaired arterial or venous blood supply due to mechanical factors (e.g., emboli, thrombi) or to blood pressure alterations.
Synonym(s): infarct.

infarct (in´färkt),

n the death of a tissue caused by partial occlusion of a vessel or vessels supplying the area.

infarct

a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the part. Clinical signs depend on the size of the devitalized tissue and the organ affected.

anemic infarct
one due to sudden interruption of flow of arterial blood to the area.
hemorrhagic infarct
one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.
References in periodicals archive ?
T2 relaxation time reflects the myocardial water content and has been shown to regions of edema in infarcted tissue.
Treatment with dHACM in this animal model improved cardiac repair following myocardial infarction through multiple paracrine effects, including through improved cell survival, enhanced vascularization, and recruitment of autologous stem cells within the infarcted cardiac tissue.
As polypeptide nerve growth factors, VEGF and TGFpi were important factors in promoting angiogenesis, VEGF was an endothelial cell mitogen with strong in vitro activities, and could specifically act on the endothelial cells and increase the vascular permeability and angiogenesis in vivo, Once the angiogenesis occurred, the blood supply towards the ischemic area was promoted, which would help to prevent the neuronal apoptosis in the ischemic penumbra, reduce the infarcted size, reduce the cerebral ischemic damages and cerebral edema [13].
Prince, "Protective effects of sinapic acid on lysosomal dysfunction in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats," Food and Chemical Toxicology, vol.
Specifically, we examined the effects of myocardial alginate injections on arrhythmogenesis and mortality; the animal cohort was further characterized by measuring (a) voluntary activity, as an index of acute LV failure, (b) heart rate variability (HRV), as an index of sympathetic activation, and (c) the size of the ischemic and infarcted zones.
Combined effects of quercetin and alpha-tocopherol on lipids and glycoprotein components in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted Wistar rats.
The presence of depressive behavior in myocardial infarcted rats was associated with an increase of apoptosis proteins indicating vulnerability for neuronal death within prefrontal cortex and hypothalamus.
Intraoperative assessment revealed an infarcted volvulus segment of small bowel with twisted mesentery and proximal obstruction.
We therefore devised a eukaryotic expression screen for genes expressed in the infarcted mouse heart that encode activators of the GDF15 promoter.
5) On physical examination, peritoneal irritation (an indication for surgery and a sign of possible SBO) is often absent, but no single diagnostic clinical sign consistently identifies the presence of infarcted bowel.
The patches had degraded, the cells had colonized the infarcted tissue and new blood vessels were forming in the vicinity of the transplanted patch.