infantile myofibromatosis

in·fan·ti·le my·o·fi·bro·ma·to·sis

myofibromatosis seen at birth or in infants, with multiple lytic bone lesions and involving soft tissue, or with visceral involvement.

infantile myofibromatosis

A condition characterized by fibrosis affecting soft tissue, bone, and viscera of infants and young children; IM is usually solitary but may be multicentric; it rarely recurs, and may regress with time. See Fibrous tumor of childhood.
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Infantile myofibromatosis (IM) is the most common fibrous tumor in infants and children under the age of two.
A biopsy of the axillary nodule was performed and histological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of infantile myofibromatosis.
Massive apoptosis in infantile myofibromatosis. A putative mechanism of tumor regression.
These features suggest a broader differential diagnostic list that includes reactive changes or spindle cell lesions, such as fibrosing pyogenic granuloma, infantile myofibromatosis, rhabdomyoma, rhabdomyomatous choristoma, or juvenile xanthogranuloma.
INTRODUCTION: Infantile myofibromatosis is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm of infancy and early childhood, typically presenting as single or multicentric nodular masses of soft tissues, bones, or visceral organs.
Features were suggestive of infantile myofibromatosis solitary form.
These tumors appear to represent "true HPCs." (9) They show a considerable morphologic overlap with related tumors such as infantile myofibromatosis, solitary adult myofibroma, glomangiopericytoma, glomangiomyoma, and some vascular leiomyomas (angioleiomyomas).
Microscopically, infantile fibromatosis must be differentiated from infantile myofibromatosis and infantile fibrosarcoma because their histologic resemblance is close.
Infantile myofibromatosis is generally considered to be a benign process, unlike aggressive fibromatusis and fibrosarcomas, which are invasive lesions with metastatic potential.
In 1981, Chung and Enzinger published a review of 61 cases of infantile myofibromatosis and described only 2 patients with a solitary myofibroma of the cheek or parotid area.
The solitary congenital fibromatosis (infantile myofibromatosis) of bone is most commonly seen in the craniofacial bones of patients 2 years old or younger.

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