endemic nonbacterial infantile gastroenteritis

(redirected from infantile gastroenteritis)

en·dem·ic non·bac·te·ri·al in·fan·tile gas·tro·en·ter·i·tis

an endemic viral gastroenteritis of young children (6 months-12 years) that is especially widespread during winter, caused by strains of rotavirus (family Reoviridae); the incubation period is 2-4 days, with symptoms lasting 3-5 days, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever, and vomiting.

en·dem·ic non·bac·te·ri·al in·fan·tile gas·tro·en·ter·i·tis

An endemic viral gastric disorder of young children (6 months-12 years) that is especially widespread during winter, caused by strains of rotavirus (family Reoviridae); the incubation period is 2-4 days, with symptoms lasting 3-5 days, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever, and vomiting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Acute infantile gastroenteritis associated with human enteric viruses in Tunisia.
Detection of caliciviruses associated with acute infantile gastroenteritis in Salvador, an urban center in Northeast Brazil.
coli which were antigenically related to each other were linked to outbreaks of severe infantile gastroenteritis.1 Despite this body of evidence, it was only after Bray and colleagues at the Hillingdon Hospital near London reported that a particular strain of E.
Also, during the early 1970s, Ruth Bishop, Ian Holmes and colleagues at Melbourne's Royal Children's Hospital and the University of Melbourne identified rotavirus, which was the first virus demonstrated to cause infantile gastroenteritis. (7)
coli as a cause of infantile gastroenteritis. Arch Dis Child 1973; 48: 923-926.
The virus is the most common cause of infantile gastroenteritis. It hospitalises about 18,000 children each year in England and Wales, and can be potentially fatal in under two-year-olds.
Laboratory investigations on rotavirus in infantile gastroenteritis in Jamaica.
Infantile gastroenteritis associated with excretion of pestivirus antigens.
Structured surveillance of infantile gastroenteritis in East Anglia, UK: incidence of infection with common viral gastroenteric pathogens.
28 nm particles in faeces in infantile gastroenteritis. Lancet 1975;2:451-2.