inert

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inert

 [in-ert´]
inactive.

in·ert

(in-ert'),
1. Slow in action; sluggish; inactive.
2. Devoid of active chemical properties, as the inert gases.
3. Denoting a drug or agent having no pharmacologic or therapeutic action.
[L. iners, unskillful, sluggish, fr. in, neg. + ars, art]

inert

/in·ert/ (in-ert´) inactive.

inert

(ĭn-ûrt′)
adj.
1. Chemistry Not readily reactive with other elements; forming few or no chemical compounds.
2. Having no pharmacologic, metabolic, or other physiological effect.

in·ert′ly adv.
in·ert′ness n.

inert

[inurt′]
Etymology: L, iners, idle
1 not moving or acting, such as inert matter.
2 (of a chemical substance) not taking part in a chemical reaction.
3 (of a medical ingredient) not active pharmacologically; serving only as a bulking, binding, or sweetening agent or other excipient in a medication.

in·ert

(in-ĕrt')
1. Slow in action; sluggish; inactive.
2. Devoid of active chemical properties, as in the inert gases.
3. Denoting a drug or agent having no pharmacologic or therapeutic action.

inert

lacking any active nature, usually applied to physiological inactivity or to inactivity of certain genes.

inert

without pharmacological/therapeutic action

in·ert

(in-ĕrt')
1. Slow in action; sluggish; inactive.
2. Devoid of active chemical properties, as the inert gases.

inert,

adj inactive; without the ability to act, move, change, or resist.

inert

inactive.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contained in sturdy, environmentally friendly, biodegradable packages, the reagent vials feature optical-quality glass for accuracy, Teflon[R]-lined screw caps for inertness, and vials in the standard 16-mm-diameter size for compatibility with most reactors and digestors.
Its chemical and electrical inertness prevent the signal wires from accepting anything but the data from the electrode.
Eventually, an injection-molded unit, the "RIMZ" as it is now called, was produced using dimensions developed from a machined master prototype and an advanced engineering polymer (selected for its inertness and repeated impact resistance).
Polypropylene will remain the leading thermoplastic resin due to its good mechanical and thermal properties, chemical inertness, stiffness, dimensional stability and high heat resistance.
Diamonds and diamond-like carbon films have received much attention due to their great hardness, chemical inertness, optical transparency, and good field emission, among other properties.
But the material must be regularly tested for its inertness to see if it absorbs and transmits flavors.
His experience of Faerian Drama and ultimate acceptance of it allows him to transcend the inertness of his ego to learn that what he had wanted was so close at hand.
Black's picture is another illustration of the inborn inertness of the educational system to change (and one wishes modern educational policy-makers had more of this inertness).
Given the inertness of the latter materials, von der Abe's blood is her agent for expression--her version of Robert Ryman's white paint.
A PTFE-coated catheter made from flat fine wire ribbon takes advantage of both inertness and lubricity properties.
We had a hint of such inertness in the final third of The Crossing, with its seemingly endless series of garrulous old desert mystics and their pseudoprofundities about life, death, and The Meaning of It All.