inert

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inert

 [in-ert´]
inactive.

in·ert

(in-ert'),
1. Slow in action; sluggish; inactive.
2. Devoid of active chemical properties, as the inert gases.
3. Denoting a drug or agent having no pharmacologic or therapeutic action.
[L. iners, unskillful, sluggish, fr. in, neg. + ars, art]

inert

/in·ert/ (in-ert´) inactive.

inert

(ĭn-ûrt′)
adj.
1. Chemistry Not readily reactive with other elements; forming few or no chemical compounds.
2. Having no pharmacologic, metabolic, or other physiological effect.

in·ert′ly adv.
in·ert′ness n.

inert

[inurt′]
Etymology: L, iners, idle
1 not moving or acting, such as inert matter.
2 (of a chemical substance) not taking part in a chemical reaction.
3 (of a medical ingredient) not active pharmacologically; serving only as a bulking, binding, or sweetening agent or other excipient in a medication.

in·ert

(in-ĕrt')
1. Slow in action; sluggish; inactive.
2. Devoid of active chemical properties, as in the inert gases.
3. Denoting a drug or agent having no pharmacologic or therapeutic action.

inert

lacking any active nature, usually applied to physiological inactivity or to inactivity of certain genes.

inert

without pharmacological/therapeutic action

in·ert

(in-ĕrt')
1. Slow in action; sluggish; inactive.
2. Devoid of active chemical properties, as the inert gases.

inert,

adj inactive; without the ability to act, move, change, or resist.

inert

inactive.
References in periodicals archive ?
Depending on the inertness of the bottle material, the odor intensity of the water will increase or decrease.
Given the inertness of the latter materials, von der Abe's blood is her agent for expression--her version of Robert Ryman's white paint.
A PTFE-coated catheter made from flat fine wire ribbon takes advantage of both inertness and lubricity properties.
If that happens, Nieh suspects that superplastic ceramics' manufacturing properties could make them especially attractive for creating small, intricate forms, such as parts of implants used in the body, where ceramics' chemical inertness would be valuable.
This company now offers its SV51 Series solenoid valves in both virgin TFE Teflon and with a polypropylene body for maximum inertness and compatibility with a wide range of fluids.
We had a hint of such inertness in the final third of The Crossing, with its seemingly endless series of garrulous old desert mystics and their pseudoprofundities about life, death, and The Meaning of It All.
In contrast to the inertness of the civic leaders, some of the old families, old institutions, and a few wacky local residents, are, in a totally uncoordinated way, beginning to create a new vision for the city.
also introduced the Chrompack CP-Sil 8 for amines, which employs a multi purpose deactivation technique to deliver higher inertness and improved peak shapes, company officials report.
Coming straight from one to the other, the inertness of the dominant dark passages in The Glebe Farm, which at one time belonged to the Pre-Raphaelite sculptor Thomas Woolner, is immediately apparent.
Chemical inertness is a unique property of diamond.
As a result, chemists no longer liked to use the term inert gases, preferring noble gases as less likely to signify absolute inertness.
They have a combination of characteristics--including inertness, relative lack of toxicity, and an ability to dissolve oxygen--that makes them well-suited for medical applications.