inertia

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inertia

 [in-er´shah] (L.)
inactivity; inability to move spontaneously.
colonic inertia weak muscular activity of the colon, leading to distention of the organ and constipation.
uterine inertia sluggishness of uterine contractions in labor.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·er·ti·a

(in-er'she-ă, in-ĕr'shă),
1. The tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

in·er·ti·a

(in-ĕr'shē-ă)
1. The tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

in·er·ti·a

(in-ĕr'shē-ă)
1. Tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Although serving the demand on segment 6-3 in the first time window is profitable, if the demand features and shippers' choice inertias are considered, a ballast voyage on segment 6-5 in the first time window may help maximize the profit over the entire planning horizon, which means that a carrier may forego cargo to make ballast voyages first to obtain greater market share and profits during subsequent time windows.
This article optimizes tramp spot shipping scheduling by considering shippers' choice inertias, causality between carriers' completed services and subsequent market share, and the temporal and spatial fluctuation of bulk cargo shipping demands.
In this case we need models for a PGS with three sun gears and a long pinion, Se elements for interaction with the input and output, I elements for rotating inertias, R elements for clutches, Sf elements for defining grounding speed constrains on band brakes, 1-junctions for single speed points which are physically located at locations of individual rigid rotational transmission components, and 0-junctions for single torque points at locations of physical contact between components (gear mesh) or at locations where exists a relative motion between components such as in clutches and brakes.
The model consists of an I-field (I:M) reflecting all effective inertias coupled to the independent states, resistors R representing clutch friction torques, and transformers TF reflecting the gear ratios that define clutch torque paths through the system, i.e., relative speeds across the clutches.
Inertia is a term borrowed from the "moment of inertia" in mechanics.
Moment of inertia [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]
The energy that exists in the present creates an inertia that flows into the future.
The very act of thinking about the future creates a new inertia, and this inertia changes our energy flows into the future.
(Where T = torque in lb-ft, I = inertia in lb-[ft.sup.2], and t = time in seconds)
As indicated in Equation (3), the reactance torque results from conservative (spring-like) forces ([T.sub.conservative]) and inertia terms, namely, the rigid body yaw rotational inertia of the wheelchair assembly ([MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), drive wheel spin rotational inertia ([MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), caster yoke assembly rigid body yaw rotational inertia ([MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), caster wheel spin rotational inertia ([MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), and the rigid body yaw rotational inertia of the wheelchair occupant ([MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]).
Table 1 provides a cross reference chart plotting reflected load-to-motor inertia ratios vs expected machine servosystem response.
Values of inertia and resilience were transformed to the arcsine of the square root of the proportion before analysis of variance.