inertia

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inertia

 [in-er´shah] (L.)
inactivity; inability to move spontaneously.
colonic inertia weak muscular activity of the colon, leading to distention of the organ and constipation.
uterine inertia sluggishness of uterine contractions in labor.

in·er·ti·a

(in-er'she-ă, in-ĕr'shă),
1. The tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]

inertia

/in·er·tia/ (-er´shah) [L.] inactivity; inability to move spontaneously.
colonic inertia  weak muscular activity of the colon, leading to distention of the organ and constipation.
uterine inertia  sluggishness of uterine contractions in labor.

inertia

[inur′shə]
Etymology: L, idleness
1 the tendency of a body at rest to remain at rest unless acted on by an outside force, and the tendency of a body in motion to remain at motion in the direction in which it is moving unless acted on by an outside force.
2 an abnormal condition characterized by a general inactivity or sluggishness, such as colonic inertia or uterine inertia.

in·er·ti·a

(in-ĕr'shē-ă)
1. The tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]

in·er·ti·a

(in-ĕr'shē-ă)
1. Tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]

inertia

inactivity, inability to move spontaneously.

colonic inertia
weak muscular activity of the colon, leading to distention of the organ and constipation.
inertia time
the time required to overcome the inertia of a muscle after reception of a stimulus from a nerve.
uterine inertia
sluggishness of uterine contractions in labor.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rotational inertia of manual wheelchairs is important because even a slight mass redistribution within the system can cause an affective change in required propulsion effort.
Also, the moment of inertia of the wheels about their axles is neglected in order to narrow the study's focus on yaw inertia.
The distance between the wheelchair's center of mass and the axis of rotation of the iMachine was used to apply the parallel axis theorem when calculating the yaw moment of inertia about the wheelchair's center of mass.
0] is the inertia of the unloaded iMachine turntable.
A t-test was used to assess inertia differences between forward and rear axle positions.
As indicated in Equation (6), the rotational inertia is inversely proportional to the square of the measured resonance frequency.
The highly linear trend in Figure 5 shows that the measured rotational inertia is strongly correlated with the mass of the wheelchair configuration.
For example, a wheelchair user turning slowly would be less likely to notice the reaction difference from the reduced mass and inertia of a wheelchair.
Because real-life mobility includes the need to change direction, the wheelchair's yaw moment of inertia also influences effort required to maneuver.
This was a need for a production test machine, where 100 percent of products produced were tested at speeds up to 6,000 rpm and torsional vibration tested at 2,000 rpm over the range of [+ or -] 5 percent of set speed, Production test cyclic rate was 60 Hz and inertia was approximately equal to 1 lb-[ft.