inertia

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inertia

 [in-er´shah] (L.)
inactivity; inability to move spontaneously.
colonic inertia weak muscular activity of the colon, leading to distention of the organ and constipation.
uterine inertia sluggishness of uterine contractions in labor.

in·er·ti·a

(in-er'she-ă, in-ĕr'shă),
1. The tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]

inertia

/in·er·tia/ (-er´shah) [L.] inactivity; inability to move spontaneously.
colonic inertia  weak muscular activity of the colon, leading to distention of the organ and constipation.
uterine inertia  sluggishness of uterine contractions in labor.

inertia

[inur′shə]
Etymology: L, idleness
1 the tendency of a body at rest to remain at rest unless acted on by an outside force, and the tendency of a body in motion to remain at motion in the direction in which it is moving unless acted on by an outside force.
2 an abnormal condition characterized by a general inactivity or sluggishness, such as colonic inertia or uterine inertia.

in·er·ti·a

(in-ĕr'shē-ă)
1. The tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]

inertia

inactivity; lack of spontaneous movement; e.g. a physical body resists movement from its position of rest until its inertia is overcome by greater external forces

in·er·ti·a

(in-ĕr'shē-ă)
1. Tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]

inertia (inur´shə),

n according to Newton's law of inertia, the tendency of a body that is at rest to remain at rest and a body that is in motion to continue in motion with constant speed in the same straight line unless acted on by an outside force.

inertia

inactivity, inability to move spontaneously.

colonic inertia
weak muscular activity of the colon, leading to distention of the organ and constipation.
inertia time
the time required to overcome the inertia of a muscle after reception of a stimulus from a nerve.
uterine inertia
sluggishness of uterine contractions in labor.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, more than 300 gs was necessary to inertially release an RCF 67 buckle with about 100 pounds of belt webbing tension.
their relative motions remain the same, whether their space is moving inertially or at rest.
However, here we adopt a Boussinesq-type approach that focuses on the dynamics of the cloud fluid, treating density differences as inertially insignificant in the cloud flow, with heat release due to condensation significantly enhancing buoyancy.
Wurden said that Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) was a subset of Magneto-mertial Fusion, where a magnetic field is used to inhibit heat flow in an inertially compressed (high pressure) target plasma and thereby ease driver requirements.
After the sustainer (second-stage) rocket motor burns out, three darts mounted on the top of the missile separate and continue to the target inertially.
The new joint family of inertially aided munitions (IAM) gives these aircraft the tools to do the mission, day or night, in almost any type of weather.
At large scales, the inertially driven system enforces the dominance of physically derived fluid motion; plankton, advected by currents, adjust their life histories to the changing oceanic environment.
The weapon is inertially guided up to mid-course, using target data from the multifunction radar; in the homing phase an electromagnetic seeker takes over ensuring maximum precision.
the Administration's position is that substantial investment in IFE should await the achievement of ignition for an inertially confined plasma in a controlled manner on NIF or other facilities.
During World War II, influential leaders of the German war effort were heroic believers in the fate-reversing, if not war-winning, powers of a parade of secret weapons, including jet fighters and bombers, super tanks, and inertially guided rockets.
Although the title of the report might lead one to believe that the entire OFES program was assessed, the preface of the document makes the following disclaimers: "The report focuses on the science of magnetically confined plasma and the programmatic strategy for long-term progress in this area, but it does not directly address inertially confined plasmas .