inertia

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inertia

 [in-er´shah] (L.)
inactivity; inability to move spontaneously.
colonic inertia weak muscular activity of the colon, leading to distention of the organ and constipation.
uterine inertia sluggishness of uterine contractions in labor.

in·er·ti·a

(in-er'she-ă, in-ĕr'shă),
1. The tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]

in·er·ti·a

(in-ĕr'shē-ă)
1. The tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]

in·er·ti·a

(in-ĕr'shē-ă)
1. Tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]
References in periodicals archive ?
Liu, "A compound scheme on parameters identification and adaptive compensation of nonlinear friction disturbance for the aerial inertially stabilized platform," ISA Transactions, vol.
Fan, "LuGre-Model-based friction compensation in direct-drive inertially stabilized platforms," IFAC Proceedings Volumes, vol.
Pautler, "A reduced-order disturbance observer applied to inertially stabilized Line-of-Sight control," in Proceedings of the 25th SPIE Acquisition, Tracking, Pointing, and Laser Systems Technologies XXV, vol.
Even in prerelativistic physics, a body moving inertially has kinetic energy.
The F-117's two bomb bays have internal storage for a variety of weapons, including Paveway II and III laser-guided bombs, unguided cluster-bomb units, and the inertially guided and GPS-aided enhanced GBU-27, which can also guide to a laser spot.
Examples may include detection of enemy Integrated Air Defense System (IADS) emissions, location of enemy IADS, and destruction of enemy air defense systems by way of general purpose, inertially aided, or laser-guided bombs (LGB).
Decreasing the cost of near-precision strike weapons--JDAMS, for example--adding low cost ubiquitous GPS to inertially guided "dumb" bombs with steerable tail fins to achieve near-precision accuracy versus optical or laser guided weapons that are spoofed by adverse weather or common battlefield obscurants, such as burning oil.
If internal models are available in the interpretation process for predicting future states (velocity, position, and orientation components) based on inertial measurements, two essential information cross-feed branches become possible: (1) Own body pose need not be derived from vision but can be predicted from the actual state and inertially measured data (including the effects of perturbations) and (2) slow drift components, occurring when only inertial data are used for state prediction, can be compensated for by visual observation of stationary objects far away in the outside world.
First, it is unknown whether the present analysis can be applied to inertially induced motion sickness (e.g.
An imaging seeker such as Damask can achieve "substantial improvement in the final accuracy [compared to] inertially guided weapons," said Graff.
Open-path systems are generally laser-guided or inertially guided AGVS in the U.S.
Most side- and end-release buckles can open inertially.(2) The automobile industry, however, asserts that inertial release cannot occur in a real accident.