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inertia

 [in-er´shah] (L.)
inactivity; inability to move spontaneously.
colonic inertia weak muscular activity of the colon, leading to distention of the organ and constipation.
uterine inertia sluggishness of uterine contractions in labor.

in·er·ti·a

(in-er'she-ă, in-ĕr'shă),
1. The tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]

inertia

/in·er·tia/ (-er´shah) [L.] inactivity; inability to move spontaneously.
colonic inertia  weak muscular activity of the colon, leading to distention of the organ and constipation.
uterine inertia  sluggishness of uterine contractions in labor.

inertia

[inur′shə]
Etymology: L, idleness
1 the tendency of a body at rest to remain at rest unless acted on by an outside force, and the tendency of a body in motion to remain at motion in the direction in which it is moving unless acted on by an outside force.
2 an abnormal condition characterized by a general inactivity or sluggishness, such as colonic inertia or uterine inertia.

in·er·ti·a

(in-ĕr'shē-ă)
1. The tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]

inertia

inactivity; lack of spontaneous movement; e.g. a physical body resists movement from its position of rest until its inertia is overcome by greater external forces

in·er·ti·a

(in-ĕr'shē-ă)
1. Tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]

inertia (inur´shə),

n according to Newton's law of inertia, the tendency of a body that is at rest to remain at rest and a body that is in motion to continue in motion with constant speed in the same straight line unless acted on by an outside force.

inertia

inactivity, inability to move spontaneously.

colonic inertia
weak muscular activity of the colon, leading to distention of the organ and constipation.
inertia time
the time required to overcome the inertia of a muscle after reception of a stimulus from a nerve.
uterine inertia
sluggishness of uterine contractions in labor.
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The National Academies of Science and Engineering National Research Council Committee on the Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy Systems has been conducting "An Assessment of the Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy".