inertia


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inertia

 [in-er´shah] (L.)
inactivity; inability to move spontaneously.
colonic inertia weak muscular activity of the colon, leading to distention of the organ and constipation.
uterine inertia sluggishness of uterine contractions in labor.

in·er·ti·a

(in-er'she-ă, in-ĕr'shă),
1. The tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]

inertia

/in·er·tia/ (-er´shah) [L.] inactivity; inability to move spontaneously.
colonic inertia  weak muscular activity of the colon, leading to distention of the organ and constipation.
uterine inertia  sluggishness of uterine contractions in labor.

inertia

[inur′shə]
Etymology: L, idleness
1 the tendency of a body at rest to remain at rest unless acted on by an outside force, and the tendency of a body in motion to remain at motion in the direction in which it is moving unless acted on by an outside force.
2 an abnormal condition characterized by a general inactivity or sluggishness, such as colonic inertia or uterine inertia.

in·er·ti·a

(in-ĕr'shē-ă)
1. The tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]

inertia

inactivity; lack of spontaneous movement; e.g. a physical body resists movement from its position of rest until its inertia is overcome by greater external forces

in·er·ti·a

(in-ĕr'shē-ă)
1. Tendency of a physical body to oppose any force tending to move it from a position of rest or to change its uniform motion.
2. Denoting inactivity or lack of force, lack of mental or physical vigor, or sluggishness of thought or action.
[L. want of skill, laziness]

inertia (inur´shə),

n according to Newton's law of inertia, the tendency of a body that is at rest to remain at rest and a body that is in motion to continue in motion with constant speed in the same straight line unless acted on by an outside force.

inertia

inactivity, inability to move spontaneously.

colonic inertia
weak muscular activity of the colon, leading to distention of the organ and constipation.
inertia time
the time required to overcome the inertia of a muscle after reception of a stimulus from a nerve.
uterine inertia
sluggishness of uterine contractions in labor.
References in periodicals archive ?
A real-time value of system inertia is later calculated using the same approach, By using actual system conditions.
Under this precondition, the proposed identification algorithm can online obtain highly accurate moment of inertia of the system, viscous friction coefficient, and load torque in short time.
Table 1: The inertia indices, nullity and signature of CNC4 [n] with 1 n 11.
A reasonable level of institutional inertia provides the necessary stability, continuity and legitimacy which allows institutions and society to function.
Cervical stenosis due to uterine inertia leading to dystocia in a crossbred cattle.
It is common practice to express the angular momentum of the rotor in terms of a normalized inertia constant when all generators of a particular type will have similar 'inertia' values regardless of their rating.
Because of lower inertia, constant addition of energy over time means the small company will soon accelerate to fantastic speeds.
For the particular speed of 4000 rpm, the calculations were performed for the specific case where the inertia effects are neglected.
Benelli's patent on the inertia drive system recently expired, and TriStar was quick to move to incorporate the inertia drive system in their new tactical and home-defense TEC 12.
Inertia is characteristic to all objects with mass and reflects the relative tendency of an object to resist any change in its motion.
PI (Physik Instrumente) (Auburn, MA) has launched a new type of positioning stage based on a miniaturized ceramic inertia drive.
The line offers three inertia versions: standard, high-dynamic for rapid acceleration jobs and high-inertia for maximum smooth running.